The Warren

The Warren run their venue hub  at St Peter’s Church.

In the safe hands of the Otherplace Productions team, its programme boasts a rich, diverse and impressive choice of theatre, comedy, cabaret and music. It calls itself a “festival within a festival”.



Essential Links

Visit the web site

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Contact The Warren

AUDIO INTERVIEW: Paul Levy talks to Nicky Haydn about The Warren’s 2018 Fringe Programme



Show highlights and recommendations


I want to see… at The Warren

 

Our  intelligent and intuitive way to find a show or event at The Warren.

I want to see…

.. the world premiere of Jane Austen’s final novel, Persuasion. Then see Persuasion

… an acclaimed comedy duo. Then see The Establishment: Le Bureau De Strange

… an afternoon show for children with comedy and acrobatics. Then see Chores

… a top quality Steven Berkoff play. Then see East

… a new comedy – surreal narratives with playful and interactive comedy. Then see Pelican

… a wild ride, with rhythm, body percussion, singing, stomping, clowning and the spirit of Scotland. Then see Scotland!

… a unique solo theatre piece about how Josh Gardner saved Europe by reenacting Frodo’s journey to Mordor.  Then see The Laud of the Rings

… a magical show for threes and over. Then see Captain Cauliflower and Marvin the Mischievous Moose

We’ll be adding more recommendations in the run up to, and during the Fringe.



Link Collage

Here’s a different way to find a show at The Warren.

We’ve chosen a few intriguing images from the programme that grabbed us.

Click on an image that draws you and you’ll find a show – then get booking…

  

  

  

  

  

  

  



Keyword Chaos

We’ve selected evocative phrases from the Warren programme.

Click on the ones that intrigue you and you might just find the show you need to see…

“Two maids attempt to overthrow their mistress in a callous murder plot that ends in catastrophe. Consumed by hate and obsession, the girls quickly become victims to their own depraved games”

“She puts the “oh” in “oh my god” and the “ding” in demanding. “

“Imagine if you could sit down in Fagin’s den or share a rum with Bill Sykes while he mesmerises you with cards.”

“a provocative and moving performance that follows one man’s desperate attempt to live out a fantasy. Venture into a world of silly wigs, plastic feet, Serbian border police and Macedonian opera, as reality and fiction collide in an epic retelling of your favourite book/movie trilogy.”

“Are you a feminist if you shave your legs but keep your pits free flowing? Are you a terrible person if you only own a wooden toothbrush so that someone might see it and think you’re a revolutionist? And is it okay to say that most days your only companion in this constantly connected disconnected world is your overpowering body odour?”

“Zora walks on stage for the first time as a woman – it’s time for her to compere a comedy gig on her own.”

 



INTERVIEW

Performer Rachel E. Thorn tslks about Improvsed Play,  Between Us

What’s the theme of your show?

Between Us tells the inside story of one couple’s relationship. Completely improvised from audience suggestions, we discover what makes us fall in love and what makes us fall apart.

What’s new or unique about the show?

Between Us is a play that explores the joy and the pain of being in love. But here’s the twist – it’s completely improvised.

We use anecdotes from the audience to inspire our characters and perform their story.

The drama hinges on the thrill of the unexpected. Each performance is unique because it depends on the audience in that particular venue at that particular time.

How did the show come into being?

Alex and I met performing improvised comedy. We created Scriptless In Seattle, the improvised romcom, which was nominated for Best Improv Show at Leicester Comedy Festival. We had so much fun laughing at love, but it also inspired us to use improv to explore relationships more honestly, more thoroughly. So we created Between Us. The show is always very funny, but it can also be heartbreaking.

Describe one of your rehearsals.

Lots of kissing. And eye contact. We work at breaking down physical boundaries so that the couples we play always seem authentic. Often people think we are a couple, but actually I’m married and Alex is gay. We have a great connection as performers, and then we go home to real life.

How is the show developing?

The show develops every time we perform it, as we find new aspects of ourselves to bring to our characters and new ways to fall in and out of love.

How has the writer been involved?

There’s no writer. The whole show evolves from the particular connection between me, Alex and that show’s audience.

How have you experimented?: We’re always trying new methods of connecting with each other, whether that’s physical exercises, Meisner exercises or breathing exercises.

Where do your ideas come from?

We wish we knew! The well of creativity is endless and the subconscious is a fascinating place. The great thing about improv is there’s no time to check yourself or judge yourself. We just access what feels right for the story we’re telling in that moment.

How do your challenge yourself or yourselves?

When we watch our shows back we obsessively analyse how we made each decision, how the themes of the show tie together and why we created what we created. This is fascinating because there’s no space for that level of reflection in the moment while we’re performing.

What are your future plans for the show ?

We are currently applying for summer fringe festivals and studio theatres. Watch this space! Well, watch our Facebook page, anyway.

What are your favourite shows, and why?

We love great improv, especially Phil Lunn and RH Experience. Of course I love CSI: Crime Scene Improvisation too…but then I’m in it so I would!

Show dates, times and booking info

Venue: The Warren, St Peter’s Church North, York Place, Brighton BN1 4GU
Dates: 4th & 5th May 19.30. 6th & 7th May 13.30. (60 minutes)
Tickets: £8-£9.50
Book here

Company web site: http://www.facebook.com/betweenusimprov



INTERVIEW

Solo Actor Richard Canal talks about Cry, Blueberry

What’s the theme of your show?

It is November 16th, 1932. The Depression is at its greatest, and vaudeville – the roaring heartbeat of the ’20s – has ceased to beat. Isaac Solomon Loew, a Jewish Mississippian, performs on Broadway as Blueberry, a happy-go-lucky Pierrot. Wrestling with guilts of times bygone, he frequently flees from his pain not only into performance, but also into sex. His increasingly addictive escapes have finally lost him his wife, at the same times as he loses his employment. He enters his dressing-room for the last time; and as he pours his heart out to the audience, shedding his painted mask, he wrestles with his memories, mistakes and misdeeds – either to their conclusion, or his own.

After two critically acclaimed runs at the Cockpit in London, Richard Canal’s CRY, BLUEBERRY comes to the Brighton Fringe at the Warren (Blockhouse). Drawing from his own experiences—and touching upon themes including sex addiction, racial injustice, the accountability of bystanders, the profundity of clowning and the ethics of repentance and forgiveness – Canal’s intimate confessions wipe off the make-up to reveal the face of himself, his persona and the United States’ first decades into the 20th century.

What’s new or unique about the show?

Solo work can often fall into the trap of navel-gazing; CRY, BLUEBERRY is strictly wary of this. To write as a white male about difficult issues such as sex addiction and one’s place in the perpetuation of prejudice is a contentious task. As the writer, I have endeavoured to make it a reconciliatory piece based on confession and honest introspection, a sincere apology that carries not with it an expectation of forgiveness. Members of society are having, and have always had, a deep existential struggle with confronting their place in the ill workings of the world, closing off access to truth and reconciliation. Solo plays have great potential to lay the one character raw and bare in front of an audience so that, through their revealing, the community may reach some sort of resolution, and perhaps even a degree of revelation.

Respect for works like Spalding Gray’s SWIMMING TO CAMBODIA and Simon McBurney’s THE ENCOUNTER prove audiences are willing to take the risk for raw, self-revealing art. Confessional, forum theatre pieces are important. Theatre is at its noblest not only when it is honest about what we experience, but also when it is candid about what we have done. Betrayal; being a bystander to racial violence; the use of women, including sex workers, for pleasure and escape—these, and his involvement in them, are things Isaac must grapple with for the rest of his life, out of a need for healing and without conditions of forgiveness. It is important for artists to start talking about their, and their characters’, own agency and responsibility, even culpability, in the workings and ways of the world.

Additionally, CRY, BLUEBERRY stays true to its roots in the United States, but still branches out to touch on universal themes. And in such divisive times as we live in, with the current political situation and the deep political and social polarization—where people refuse to confront their own guilt and also ability to become better—CRY, BLUEBERRY is a piece not only for 1932, but indeed for 2018.

How did the show come into being?

Creating Isaac Solomon Loew on paper and in person was a journey rife with borderline panic: for, though his story is historically placed and not my own, Isaac is in truth an extension of myself. If I were to enter a cave, exclaim my inner secrets, the distorted, magnified, amplified echoes reverberating back would be Isaac’s. I have been haunted by memories of things I should and shouldn’t have done; been stuck in a vicious cycle of depending on temporal happiness; come close to ending my life. And, just as for Blueberry, the stage has been my house among clouds. Pulling the curtain off his Oak of Sorries and putting it on full, naked display was, therefore, a disrobing act—both for Isaac, and for me.

But Isaac is an extension, I hope, of the human state, too. His tale is relevant beyond myself. We all have our joys and crises, haunts and misdeeds. Who has not been crushed by their own Great Depression? Who has not had, no matter how long or short, their own Roaring Twenties? Who has not attempted his or her own escapes from pain, only to find it forever clinging to one’s shadow? Who does not harbour regrets, misdoings, and guilts untold?

In presenting Isaac’s state (and mine), then, I hope I can reach out to those who bear what can be an oftentimes difficult human state. My inspiration was my own guilt; this piece is, for me, a cathartic one. As Isaac opens his heart, I open mine; and I hope he who em- bodies Isaac, they who read him, and those who see and hear him will be moved to open their own, too.

Describe one of your rehearsals.

During the development process, George Goodell (my director and good friend) and I would spend our rehearsals putting what I wrote onto its feet. The overarching objectives were to give Isaac emotional breadth – ranging from the highest levity to the deepest gravity – and to help his manner of speaking maintain balance between the lyrical and the everyday.

Research into the life in early 20th-century United States was, of course, fundamental to giving the show a genuine feel. We also spent time reading and watching a wide range of solo shows, including Doug Wright’s I AM MY OWN WIFE, Colin Teevan’s THE EMPEROR and William Luce’s THE BELLE OF AMHERST. Sean Bruno and Luke Dixon’s CREATING SOLO PERFORMANCE, too, proved a faithful guide in experimenting.

Here it is important to thank both Amy Gwilliam and my mentor, Patrick Wilde, for their much-appreciated guidance throughout CRY, BLUEBERRY’s nascent stages.

How is the show developing?

It is going well! After taking both critiques and praises into consideration, there have been edits made since the last performance in order to make the characters Isaac introduces throughout his narrative more three-dimensional.

How has the writer been involved?

I am both the writer and the performer!

How have you experimented?

Before the run at the Cockpit in August 2017, we tested the piece at two readings, which helped the development of the piece very much indeed.

Where do your ideas come from?

For CRY, BLUEBERRY, I drew truths from the United States’ history and from my own experience, and tried to make sense of the convolution being human can be. Being my first play, it was a very frightening risk for me to take.

As a playwright, though, I am very interested in the theme of confession. I am currently writing new solo shows – one about surrealist godfather Salvador Dalí, another about the infamous Angolan warlord Jonas Savimbi, and a third about adored Belle Epoque courtesan La Bella Otero – that all grapple with this theme of unveiling oneself before an audience.

How do your challenge yourself or yourselves?

By being honest – one of the scariest things I can think of doing – in my acting, writing and being.

What are your future plans for the show ?

Aside from the Brighton Fringe, CRY, BLUEBERRY is going to be performed at the Brighton Open Air Theatre in September – and perhaps in another London venue, sooner than that. We would also like to take the production on tour in both the United Kingdom and the United States.

What are your favourite shows, and why?

Of the many I could choose, the first that comes to mind is Yaël Farber’s production at the National Theatre of Lorraine Hansberry’s LES BLANCS. I was awestruck by how brutal and uncompromising it was in wrestling with horrid legacies left behind by violence. Theatre that is honest, without compromise, is theatre I want to make.

Show dates, times and booking info

CRY, BLUEBERRY
May 11th 2018 – May 13th 2018. 7.45pm
90 minutes
The Warren, St Peters Church North, York Pl, Brighton BN1 4GU £12/£10.50 (concessions)
The Warren (otherplacebrighton.co.uk/3321/cry-blueberry), 01273 987516

Book here

Company web site: http://www.cryblueberry.wix.com/cryblueberry



INTERVIEW

Writer, Actor and creator Bramble Wallace from  Lunar Objects Theatre  talks about Am I if?

What’s the theme of your show?

One girl’s honest questions and experiences of womanhood. Can you shave your legs but keep your pits free flowing? Are you a terrible person if you only own a wooden toothbrush so that someone might see it and think you’re a revolutionist? Is Witchcraft the answer? And is it okay to say that most days your only companion in this constantly connected disconnected world is your overpowering body odor? This is a no-nonsense, raw play with female friendship at its core.

What’s new or unique about the show?

The show breaks down the fourth wall inviting the audience on a turbulent soul-bearing adventure. It uses flashbacks, minimal props to create setting and spoken word poetry. This is a no-nonsense, raw play with female friendship at its core.

It was important for me to create a story-line with little to no mention of men, with a strong focus on female friendship and of one girls honest questions and experiences of womanhood. I am passionate about making honest, insightful, comedic and relatable theatre for a large spectrum of people, but specifically for women.

How did the show come into being?

Lunar Objects Theatre Company, which I co run with my best pal Ellie, came about during our third year of university. Throughout university we had lived and studied together and had compiled many notebooks full of ideas and thoughts. We were on the beach one night seeking solace from the moon and just thought, lets put all this somewhere and Lunar Objects was born.

We wanted to create a show that address the awkward in between age where you are thrust into a grown up world but still know little about who you are, what you want, what you’re doing and where you’re going. However we realise this is a phenomena that rarely changes with age! A lot of the content within the show has come straight from my own experiance’s and ramblings that go on in my head on a daily basis.

Describe one of your rehearsals.

Laying on the floor in confusion and disappear, gallons of tea drunk, lots of dancing round the room fishing for inspiration. Then a lot of staring at scribbled notes in multiple notebooks and scraps of paper, watching Youtube for ‘ideas’. Then the serious work begins! with yoga, vocal warm-ups meditation and actioning the script. We have a lot of fun, that’s very important!

How is the show developing?

The show evolves and develops with every preview. We keep on adding to and editing our google doc, we have too much material, which is never a bad thing. we are so excited to develop the show in the future into a much longer performance.

How has the writer been involved?

I am the writer, director and performer, with Ellie the co founder of Lunar Objects being an anchor for the social media and a sound board for ideas. She pulls me back to reality when I run away with a crazy not so logistical idea.

How have you experimented?

The show started as two hander with both me and Ellie, however, Ellie had to move to Germany for work before our premier at Camden fringe. So I completely re wrote the script to be very different, still with the same themes and aims but very different. and Am I if? was born.

Where do your ideas come from?

As I mentioned before, throughout university Ellie and I lived and studied together and had compiled many notebooks full of ideas and thoughts.

A lot of the content within the show has come straight from my own experience’s and ramblings that go on in my head on a daily basis.But I also take inspiration from women around me, there experiences and worries and vocalise them. We also have a lot of different influences from illustrators like Sally Nixon, photographers like Petra Collins and poets like Hollie McNish.

What are your future plans for the show ?

I am really excited to see where the show ‘Am I if?’ takes me. I would love to develop the show even further, and keep growing it with every performance, Edinburgh 2019 is in planning. I also really enjoyed collaborating with The Waitress Club and making the promotional film for the show, so more filming is definitely on the cards.

Ellie has spent the last few months touring in Germany, when she is back in Brighton we are excited to be back creating together.

We are toying with the idea of a podcast series and definitely creating more poetry nights. I want to keep discovering new ways in which to be creative and proactive with in the industry, I just want to create, play and discover all the time! We want the industry to be further filled with exciting passionate new female voices.

Show dates, times and booking info: The Warren- The Burrow 5th- 7th of May 12pm £8 | £6.50 (concession)
Book here

Company Twitter: https://twitter.com/lunar_objects



INTERVIEW

 Jon Levene & Nathan Lang talk about  Jon & Nath Like To Party

What’s the theme of your show?

It’s a sketch comedy show that covers all the issues. From religion (including a 100% accurate re-enactment of the crucifixion of Christ) to police corruption (with a 100% accurate re-enactment of a drug bust) to a 100% accurate re-enactment of ‘The Shining’ in 7 minutes.

What’s new or unique about the show?

We’re two middle class white guys doing comedy about subjects we have very little first-hand experience with. We haven’t bothered to check but we’re pretty sure nobody else fits that bill.

How did the show come into being?

It had been bubbling away in the background of 15 years of friendship (and 3 years of hating each other). Finally we realised we could only talk to each other on stage so we made this show for Camden Fringe in 2016 and have been developing it ever since.

Describe one of your rehearsals.

Our first rehearsal started 2 years ago and hasn’t stopped. We hang out all the time and whenever we hang out we are talking through new ideas and workshopping sketches. Sometimes a session yields pages of golden script, others we just settle for watching fail videos. It depends on our mood.

How is the show developing?

The first incarnation was a pretty straightforward series of vignette sketches. What is constantly developing now is this through-line about the antagonistic nature of our comedy marriage. Basically people can pick a side, knowing there’ll be small triumphs against each other like Liverpool’s win against……., but ultimately we are stuck we each other and the only winners are the audience.

How has the writer been involved?

We’re the writers, so most of the time our involvement is pretty heavy.

How have you experimented?

We let go of the script a year ago and now we’re finding new things every time we do a gig. Every gig we try something new. And since being invited to host a monthly sketch night in Brighton, we’re generating more and more material for our characters. For instance, we did a show on Halloween last year, so we came up with a 7-minute rendition of The Shining. It is now in the show.

Where do your ideas come from?

It’s an exhaustive and complex process to come up with what we like to call ‘The Magic’. One of us has an idea, the other is forced to say “Good idea”, and we write it.

How do your challenge yourself or yourselves?:

e consider every minute we spend together a challenge.

What are your future plans for the show ?

We think a more important question is: what are other people’s plans for our show? They better be grandiose and involve extravagant riders. We’re also taking Jon & Nath Like To Party to Prague, Hastings and Edinburgh fringe festivals.

What are your favourite shows, and why?

Obviously The Stuntman because it’s Nath’s solo show and you can actually watch both of these shows on Sat 26 May and decide whether The Stuntman benefits from not having Jon in it.
But Jon could sneak in and edit this response after Nath passes out – drunk on his own narcissism – and add that some of our favourite sketch/character acts at Brighton Fringe this year are Dirty White Boys, Yes Mama!, Witt ‘n Camp, Henry Cafe: It’s Gameshow Time, David McIver, Northern Power Blouse, Nick Everritt, Jay Bennett & Lola-Rose Maxwell.

Show dates, times and booking info: 19/20/26 May, 9pm
@ The Warren
St Peter’s Church North
York Place
Brighton
BN1 4GU
Book here
Company web site: http://www.jonandnath.com



INTERVIEW

Director and Performer, Eleanore Frances from Blown Fuse Theatre talks about TAPE

What’s the theme of your show?

TAPE is a piece of multidisciplinary theatre created from the stories of Essex’s own community. Translating the community’s own experiences of mental health to the stage, TAPE uses film, physical theatre, sound and lighting to tell one man’s journey of his mental illness. Utilising his own memories to discover and understand the battle he is having with himself and society.

What’s new or unique about the show?

Born out of research and development workshops was TAPE; a piece of theatre to show one man’s suffering and battle with his own mental illness. Presenting the reality of this journey as well as the internal struggle and how it affects his mind using physical theatre, torches a water tank and a lot of cassette tapes.

How did the show come into being?

TAPE was devised by Blown Fuse themselves with help of their community in Essex who have taken part in their Research and Development workshops. During the workshops, people shared their real-life experiences and stories of mental illness and explored how it affects all types of people. The workshops also included exploration in to memory and how people perceive and see their own memories.

Describe one of your rehearsals.

In the rehearsal room, we laid out all of our research from the R&D workshops and sketched out a narrative, pinning down recurring themes and quotes. Using these excerpts, we then explored our own characters (left and right side of the brain) and how they facilitate the action on film.

How has the writer been involved?

The writing was done by Co-Deviser and performer Eleanore, using direct quotes from participants in the research and development workshops. The four monologues throughout the piece detail the slow realisation of the man coming to terms with his mental illness.

How have you experimented?

The whole process has been an experiment. We held workshops to investigate the impact that mental illness had on our community, and then used the information we were given to make a piece of multidisciplinary verbatim theatre. It has been such a learning experience: not only from the people who participated in the research and development, but also how to use the information to portray it in an artistic way.

Where do your ideas come from?

When deliberating ideas for our newest piece, we knew we wanted to focus on mental health. Having both been personally affected by mental illness, we wanted to explore the impact it had on the rest of the community as that way we’d get a more diverse and authentic experience rather than writing a piece from scratch ourselves.

How do your challenge yourself or yourselves?

Producing a verbatim piece from scratch was a huge challenge. We transferred the lengthy and in depth input we had from participants in the R&D workshops and broke it down into sections in which we made into physical theatre scenes.

The challenge in performing comes with having duck tape covering our mouths for the entire duration – it isn’t easy not being able to communicate!

What are your future plans for the show ?

We are taking the piece to Southend and Brighton this year, with plans to expand the tour next year to Bristol, Manchester and ending at Edinburgh Fringe.

29th-31st May, Brighton Fringe
The Blockhouse, Warren Venue

Book here

Company web site: http://www.blownfusetheatre.co.uk/



INTERVIEW

Creative Director Will Penswick from StraightUp Productions talks about Space Doctor

What’s the theme of your show?

Space Doctor is a family friendly, retro sci-fi parody.

What’s new or unique about the show?

The production uses AV to show clips of Space Doctor’s original series from 1973, and in general the production will be a barrage of technical elements to create a fun and vibrant extra-terrestrial show.

How did the show come into being?

The idea was developed down the pub by Will Dalrymple at University with a friend called Tim Atkin, and was originally a show about a man who works a three day week in space and “sorts out” other less decent aliens, armed with only a beautiful assistant and a machine gun. The concept eventually morphed into more of a parody of other sci-fi productions (most notably Doctor Who) and Will wrote a script that we have been working off and re-drafting ever since.

Describe one of your rehearsals.

Our rehearsals, in their early stages, are very much zones for bouncing ideas around and adapting parts of the dialogue if needed. This often comes from some early character work to see what we can find out about these bizarre throwback characters from 70s television. A lot of rehearsals are spent trying to find the relationships between characters (e.g. fans, actors, aliens) and try and find more humour in the world after that table work.

How is the show developing?

The show is becoming more about the re-creation of Space Doctor, on stage, instead of reflecting on the old (fictional) television show from the 1970s. As much as we find that kind of thing funny, we wanted to give our theatre audiences something new and exciting and farcical to watch on stage as this group of people try to re-boot a failed series. So a lot of the last month or so has been spent working on the on stage action and adding fun, physical bits away from the original dialogue in Space Doctor.

How has the writer been involved?

Will has been part of all of our rehearsals and will be playing a role in our Brighton Fringe run of Space Doctor. He directed a run of the show with me at Canal Cafe Theatre in London and is always instrumental in conversations with the cast about the background of each character and what their objectives and histories are.

How have you experimented?

We have spent a lot of time in rehearsal rooms developing physical bits of action with some new music, lighting and AV to try and find more hilarity in what is already a very absurd world (containing actual aliens and very real jeopardy).

Where do your ideas come from?

A lot of our ideas have been funded from the television and the theatre that we love to watch. In particular we have been delving into the golden era of awful sci-fi (especially in this country) to discover some absolutely ridiculous recurring themes and gimmicks that we are all very eager to put on stage and make fun of. Away from that genre, a lot of our more recent ideas have come from watching theatre that uses props sparingly but to huge effect, in that – watching a lot of puppetry and physical theatre has helped our work.

How do your challenge yourself or yourselves?

We all came together as a company, myself, Will and Mark Bittlestone, because we love writing comedy and we always focused on jokes and snappy dialogue so to have to think about the physical action and the technical side of a production as the most important aspects has been challenging but brilliant. We set ourselves the challenge of establishing and creating this sci-fi, glittery, otherworldy world physically and then stripping it back with our writing which has been incredibly fun.

What are your future plans for the show ?

After our run at The Warren at Brighton Fringe we have a one night preview at the OSO Arts Centre in London before taking Space Doctor to The Wine Bar at Gilded Balloon at the Edinburgh Fringe (1st-27th August) – so it’s going to be a fantastic and Space Doctor packed summer!

What are your favourite shows, and why?

We love meta-theatrical theatre that pokes fun at itself and its genre a lot. Work that Willis & Vere do for example, The Pretend Men also is phenomenally good fun. I’m a big fan of Sh!t Theatre too, because they manage to bring out the obsession in something so well, and convert you round to something you never thought you’d know about.

Show dates, times and booking info:
Saturday 19th May, 2:45 pm (60 mins)
Sunday 20th May, 2:45 pm (60 mins)
Thursday 24th May, 6:15 pm (60 mins)
Friday 25th May, 6:15 pm (60 mins)

Book here 

Company web site: https://straightupproductions.com/



AUDIO INTERVIEW

Paul Levy talks to Luke Rollason about Luke Rollason’s Planet Earth (Is a Work in Progress) – clown comedy without a red nose in sight.

“A low-budget, one-man nature documentary set in a future where our worst predictions came true. Following ecological collapse, thousands of endangered species are extinct, including the BBC. But one plucky (and unpaid) intern isn’t giving up, and on the programming schedule we’re getting series three. Armed with obsolete office supplies and a surreal imagination, nature’s weirdos are brought back to life by the “hugely entertaining” (Chortle), Luke Rollason.”

Paul Levy talks to Luke Rollason about Luke Rollason’s Planet Earth (Is a Work in Progress)



AUDIO INTERVIEW

Paul Levy talks to Witt’n Camp about Witt ‘n Camp SWAG. This is not comedy yet it makes people laugh, a lot of people, and a lot. Comedy or theatre? Comedy from theare? Paul Levy tries to understand and enjoys the attempt…

“Following their hit, sell-out shows in Brighton and Soho, this outrageous double-act present ‘SWAG’ – an hour of musical comedy, character stand-up and burlesque. Don’t miss this unforgettable, award nominated duo. They’re “the dog’s f***ing b***ocks” (Mike Bradwell, The Bush Theatre).”

Paul Levy talks to Witt’n Camp about Witt’n Camp SWAG



INTERVIEW

Amy, the Director from The Make Em Ups talks about Bumper Blyton The Improvised Adventure

What’s the theme of your show?

It’s an improvised Enid Blyton Adventure inspired by audience suggestions which ensures each show is spontaneous.

Come delight in lashings of ginger beer, grab a cheeky tongue sandwich or wrap your lips round a nice spotted dick!

What’s new or unique about the show?

Aside from every show being exclusive, and one-of-a-kind?

Well, the way in which we involve the audience in our show is quite unique. We ask the audience to draw their suggestions onto our giant storytelling dice, which they then roll onto the stage as part of our chose-your-own-adventure style narrative. Often the scribbled drawings are quite ahem, hard to work out, which is even more fun for us to interpret the whims of the audience!

We have live improvised music and songs, and the whole thing is performed in 1940’s period costume, some of the costumes even contain real vintage fleas for full accuracy.

How did the show come into being?

Amy, our director is the co-founder of hit west-end show Austentatious and had always wanted to create a show that was perfect for families. Added to the fact that she and producer, Jonah have an encyclopaedic knowledge and obsession for Enid Blyton, it was the most obvious answer. Which anyone who knows improv will tell you the obvious answer is the best answer!

We set about gathering some amazingly seasoned (not like crisps) like-minded performers, who equally enjoy recreating the fun and frivolity of the Enid Blyton classics that we all grew up adoring, and secretly (not that secretly) still do.

Describe one of your rehearsals.

It always begins with cake.
Then we do some warm-ups which look a lot like children’s playground games… because they ARE children’s playground games. This helps us get into the light, flexible and free mindset an improviser needs.
Then we have some more cake.
We try out new exercises that we might have learned by working with top international directors.
Then we have another piece of cake.
Obviously we then wash that all down with some nice cake.
CAKE.

How is the show developing?

Very well, thanks awfully for asking!
This is our third year of operating and previously we have played in lots of amazing huge capacity free fringe venues, this year however we embarked on our first small national tour and are brining the show to two amazing paid venues both at the Brighton fringe and in Edinburgh to come.
We’re really pleased to see a growing appreciation for Enid Blyton, as well as improv finally move into the mainstream in the eyes of the public.

How has the writer been involved?

The audience write the title. So only they are entirely to blame, and we like to remind them of that fact at the end of each show.

How have you experimented?

Many of our performers started their improv journey with short-form/ game like improv before moving onto what is known as long-form (more theatrical multi act plays). Recently we’ve started to work some of these games into our hour long narrative show, giving the audience more chances to affect the narrative and feel involved throughout.
It’s important to us that the audience feel as though they share in the moment of spontaneous creation, and that they can tell we are enjoying ourselves creating the show as much as they enjoy watching it. Or just enjoy eating all the free sweets we give them. Whichever is greater.

Where do your ideas come from?

Where do your questions come from, huh, huh?!

How do your challenge yourself or yourselves?

Once a month we have a rehearsal where we take turns in delivering a presentation to one another on a researched topic from the era. For example old money, rationing or the fascinating world of post-war drainage systems.
Last month Jonah gave a scintillating talk on public school slang.
Did you know that at Eton a ‘Wet Bob’ is slang for a Rower, a ‘Dry Bob’ is a Cricketer and a ‘Slack Bob’ does neither.
Our show is educational if not funny.

What are your future plans for the show ?

We’d like to expand our regional touring, but obviously it would be really nice if we were sponsored by Tunocks Tea cakes or similar racey modern brand that all the kids are into.
FYI we give out trays of teacakes to our audience at the start of the show. This is beneficial for two reasons; the first is it helps everyone time-travel back to yomping these down as a child. The second guarrantees everyone is so hopped up on sugar that they hallucinate that the NHS is still properly funded.

What are your favourite shows, and why?

Our show has previously been described (not by us) as a cross between Blackadder and The Mighty Boosh, a very favourible comparison I we say so ourselves!
It’s not that much of a coincidence as these are two of the groups favourite shows. We also love to watch old men go down hills in a converted bathtub, so Last of The Summer Wine and Dad’s Army are required reading
(by us).

Improv is in our bones, but it’s also great to widen our scope within live comedy and some of our favourite acts, doing exciting things right now are;
Joseph Morpurgo,
Kieran Hodgson,
John Kearns,
Massive Dad,
Trigve,
The Kagools,
Natalie Palamides,
Nick Mohammed,
Lazy Susan,
Butt Kapinski.

Show dates, times and booking info: 11th,12th,13th,28th May 2018
The Warren: Theatre Box
St Peter’s Church NorthYork Place, Brighton, BN1 4GU
£8.50-£10
@BlytonImpro
www.BlytonImpro.com

Book here

Company web site: http://blytonimpro.com



We’ll be adding more recommendations in the run up to, and during the Fringe