Review: Metamorphoses

The overriding sense, not surprisingly with these actors, is joy.


Review: Julius Caesar

A fleet powerful Julius Caesar, with some outstanding performances


Review: Twelfth Night

With Michelle Terry as Viola, one of the most touching and truthful Twelfth Nights I’ve seen.


Review: Romeo and Juliet

A fleet, brilliantly upending, wholly relevant take on the Verona-ready toxicity feeding male violence and young depression


Review: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Outdoors, this has grown prodigously. Some actors give transcendent performances up there with London’s finest. Out in the slant air this proves magical.


Review: The Tempest

Café Voltaire in ruffs invokes a magical Tempest.


Review: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Some actors give transcendent performances up there with London’s finest. Out in the slant air this will now prove magical.


Review: Paradise

A sleeping classic in the making


Review: Richard II

One of OFS’s strongest productions, it’s also a return to roots.


Review: The Odyssey

As spellbinding as Circe and Calypso in one


Review: Sweet William

Naturally enriched by living with Shakespeare Michael Pennington unearths local habitations and names for him.


Review: Troy Story

Again the most educative stand-up and a thrilling presentation. Oh and bloody funny on war, male sexuality and the Bechdel Test.


Review: Miss Julie

The end is like life-blood draining away. It’s what Strindberg meant. See it.


Review: Jekyll & Hyde

The most viscerally convulsive realisation of Jekyll or Hyde imaginable


Review: The Mahabharata

A dramatic sense of arrival the way the Odyssey here ended: a clash of even vaster ferocity, keening, treachery, humour, mischievousness, sacrifice and grief, joy and the agency of women.


Review: Metaphysicals

A cross between cheerfully-spun recital and quicksilver treasury


Review: Push and Pull

A quietly thrilling evening, after it goes off with a bang and a bear.


Review: Anton Chekhov

The nearest we’ll come to meeting Chekhov. In Pennington’s masterclass.


Review: Icarus

After all the gods and their lack of choice, we come to the final instalment, the human dimension. Where we have one. A heartfelt, satisfying finish.


Review: Aphrodite

Dazzling: wise, clever twists about choice, male determination, and consequence.


Review: Pygmalion

The most profound reinvention of this particular myth I’ve seen


Review: Orpheus

A terrific reinvention, bringing gods and heroines up from the death of myth to an altered world.


Review: Persephone

Dazzling: wise, clever twists about choice, male determination, and consequence.


Review: Henry IV Part 2

An alert, dark-hued production. We have heard the chimes at midnight


Review: The Merry Wives of Windsor

A joyful fleet production, a more-than-rough magic. What renders OFS unique is their fearlessness: a humour and zest to tear into buried Shakespeare, read the entrails.


Review: Henry IV Part 1

Here the shadows fall the more convincingly to join with those chimes at midnight in Henry IV/2.


Review: Troilus and Cressida

We’re privileged to see this rarely-performed work moulded by OFS. A play for our times.


Review: As You Like It

Heartwarming, giddyingly vital yet clear with its own truth.


Review: Macbeth

A stylishly visceral production.


Review: The Spanish Tragedy

The OFS are taking flight with the best scratch nights the Elizabethans never had.


Review: The Merchant of Venice

A fleet traversal memorable for insights the company bring during and after their performance of it


Review: King John

A tedious brief tragedy? King John is fun… It’s been said.


Review: The Madness of George III

This magnificent revival poses even more urgent questions. A twitch on the thread for all of us.


Review: Coriolanus

A Coriolanus memorable for politics sinewed with personal forces: an active interrogation of democracy. And in Josie Rourke’s production Tom Hiddleston’s someone riven by intimations of his true self


Review: The Two Noble Kinsmen

We’re looking at a bright Book of Hours. Barrie Rutter’s done it profound service, adding a warmth and agency that opens up this pageant. This is hopefully just the first of many such he’ll bring to the Globe.


Review: Antony and Cleopatra

Supremely worth it to see a pair so famous weighing equal in their own balance, perhaps for the first time.


Review: Romeo and Juliet

Completeness is just one reason to cherish this clean-driven clear-headed production


Review: Twelfth Night

Tamsin Greig’s extremes as Malvolia mark the first intimations of the terrible and define this production. The ground’s shifted.


Review: The Winter’s Tale

Far more than a curate’s egg, this production reveals things we’ve never seen


Review: Hamlet

In Michelle Terry’s quicksilver, quick-quipping Hamlet, much has been proved, from interpretive to gender fluidity in tragic action, that sets a privilege on being in at a beginning.


Review: Women Beware Women

A stylish, timely production which redefines how we experience Middleton.


Review: Nora

Stef Smith’s brilliant riff on Ibsen’s original is revelatory


Review: The Taming of the Shrew

See it and you’ll never think of the Shrew without this groundbreaking stab at the dreams of men.


Review: Teenage Dick

Ambition treads on teenage dreams and their devastation.


Review: Henry VI

The most effective condensation of the pith of the trilogy we’re likely to see.


Review: The Duchess of Malfi

The scalpel and scruple of class and coolness breaks into tragedy and gifts us three outstanding moments


Review: Richard III

This production could draw out the poison of being dead serious in terminal bursts of laughter


Review: As You Like It

For Lucy Phelps and Sophie Khan Levy above all, this is a joyful As You Like It.


Review: The Dutch Lady

A consummate production of a memorably dark comedy


Review: Bartholomew Fair

If only one could see it twice: but try it at least once.


Review: As You Like It

A heartwarming revival. Jack Laskey, Bettrys Jones and Nadia Nadarajah have made a space for this As You Like It well beyond its initial moment last year.


Review: Rosmersholm

They compel attention, they demand we follow every sigh


Review: Peter Gynt

In McArdle’s irresistible performance you’re not likely to see a finer Gynt.