Review: Paradise

A sleeping classic in the making


Review: The Odyssey

As spellbinding as Circe and Calypso in one


Review: Troy Story

Again the most educative stand-up and a thrilling presentation. Oh and bloody funny on war, male sexuality and the Bechdel Test.


Review: Miss Julie

The end is like life-blood draining away. It’s what Strindberg meant. See it.


Review: Living Newspaper #6

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch what this does with the future


Review: Uncle Vanya

The definitive Vanya for our times


Review: Amsterdam

Did I say sucker-punch? It’s what the Orange Tree do every time.


Review: The Visit

Kushner’s just brought The Visit home with him.


Review: The Tin Drum

Nico Holonics’ blaze-through avatar is unlikely to be surpassed.


Review: Hunger

An exemplary, scrupulous production so starkly contemporary, it makes Hunger contemporary forever


Review: Blood Wedding

In several ways, this is about as good as it gets.


Review: Vassa

A really worthwhile production with a few missed opportunities


Review: Amsterdam

Did I say sucker-punch? It’s what the Orange Tree do every time.


Review: The Doctor

A triumph for all concerned. Juliet Stevenson even gains in stature. Icke’s last production could hardly go better than this.


Review: Rosmersholm

They compel attention, they demand we follow every sigh


Review: Peter Gynt

In McArdle’s irresistible performance you’re not likely to see a finer Gynt.


Review: Europe

Europe’s border challenges have rarely been realized with this power.


Review: The Hunt

An outstandingly theatrical re-visioning of a film


Review: The Flies

There’s nothing like the Exchange’s approach: their bi-lingual virtuosity burns questions.


Review: Creditors

We’re unlikely to see a better production of this still rarely-performed disturber of ourselves.


Review: Miss Julie

It’s unlikely we’ll get a cleaner version, or a more absorbing production any time soon


Review: Three Sisters

This absorbing production keeps growing in the mind, like to take root.


Review: The Father

Florian Zeller's masterpiece, in a production and central performance that would do it justice anywhere.


Review: Don’t Dress for Dinner

For a farce there’s only one spot of monotony. That’s how uniformly outstanding this is.


Review: The Outsider

Like so much from The Print Room, this feels like European theatre. And we need it more desperately than ever.


Review: £¥€$ (Lies)

By the end of this you’ll know far more about the banking sector than even Robert Peston explains. Now go and play them for a fool.


Review: Exit the King

We need such risk-taking theatre back. This outstanding production of Exit the King might just remind us how to get it.


Review: Julie

A revelatory Julie for our time.


Review: Act and Terminal 3

everything – set, actors, script – come mesmerizingly and painfully together.


Review: Electra

As a gifted exploration of Electra’s themes and a transposition of them to 21st century values, this is as exhaustive, detailed and convincing as you’d wish.


Review: Medea Electronica

Like the recent Suppliants, in a very different way, Medea Electronica asks just what we mean by Greek tragedy, what our conceptions of drama without music are. An essential experience.


Review: Goats

It’s an essential drama, and an even more essential document for navigating the Syria we don’t know, that of ordinary non-opposition Syrians making the best of it and thus the worst. Perhaps a pared-down version might one day follow. It’s too good to miss for the sake of a few shaggy scenes.


Review: Bad Roads

Leading Ukraine dramatist Natal’ya Vorozhbit won’t indulge the luxury of exploring just one outstanding tableau in isolation in these six harrowing vignettes. Infinitely more than postcards from the edge of the redacted west, they nudge then kick us back out of our own barbaric comforts.


Review: The Lady From the Sea

Happy endings don’t seek the sun, though it helps. This production’s memorable not just for the matching of locale and rationale with the original, but gently aligning the two other couples into the clearer optimism of the married couple. If not all the misty tension of the original emerges, there’s certainly something to be said for allowing such light to brighten the facets of this one jewel of affirmation in Ibsen’s mature output.


Review: The Suppliant Women

In one of the most radical productions ever mounted of Aeschylus indeed any Greek tragedy we’re literally taken to its roots: as in Greece, a community chorus of fifty, twenty-one of them the suppliant women of the play’s title. In this outstanding production, everything to resurrect this astonishing vision has been invoked.


Review: The World of Yesterday

Stefan Zweig lends himself peculiarly to a theatrical dimension. It’s over in a blink. If you’re at all near, you won’t regret the Print Room’s opalescent sliver of magic conjuring the best out of this production.


Review: Minefield

Minefield is for its unique and singularly consummate exploration of its themes, outstanding, in a class apart from any show you’ll see, perhaps even of Arias. Her work must be acknowledged here now.


Review: Poison

This play’s so clear on the failure of closure and reconciling loss that it’s an index of how Poison in fact addresses, even helps us confront them.


Review: B

We need more Calderon and more of the Court’s excellent International Playwrights programme. ‘Those who are still laughing’, Brecht claimed grimly, ‘have not heard the terrible news.’ Yet he always laughed and Calderon, in William Gregory’s idiomatic translation ensures this piece is memorable because we laugh, scratch our heads, perhaps look furtively at our bags.


Review: Antigone

This Antigone is outstandingly conceived, and for the most part executed. Chittenden projects tensile expectations, stillness and a powerful arc in her work. With such a cast anything might be expected.


Review: Thebes Land

It’s good to welcome the return of this cage. Franco-Uruguayan Sergio Blanco’s Thebes Land drops back into Arcola’s Studio 1 after its acclaimed run in 2016. It’s where this will go, what both prisoner Martin and writer T are left with, that begins to shine out of this extraordinary, ground-breaking work.


Review: Prison Psychologist

A dark, intense and intimate story of love and tragedy. Worth getting up early for...


Review: Maklena

A world premiere: excellent English translation of Ukrainian playwright Mykola Kulish's 1933 play.