Review: Rika’s Rooms

Emma Wilkinson Wright manages the narrative as an odyssey punctuated by screams. It’s already a phenomenal performance and the actor is so wholly immersed in Rika you know you’re in the presence of something remarkable


Review: Cold War

Cold War ends with a draining-out of hope in Anya Chalotra and Luke Thallon; a desolate beauty the cast certainly earn.


Review: Phantasmagoria

There seem enough potential endings to make what happens neither predictable, nor entirely obvious. A first-rate cast with enough residual fascination in the characters they create to wonder at what life, and not just Deepika Arwind, might do to them. The terror is existential and we should ask what it might do to us.


Review: Passing

A mesmerising play, one that won’t fade and whose topicality will only reverberate more. The dialogue’s consummate and touching, the gradual reveals of blindness – and blandness - to racism on a memory-trip with a disastrous family album, releases a slow detonation of all that’s wrong still. One of my comedies of the year. Pretty outstanding.


Review: This Way For The Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen

Based on the writing of poet Tadeusz Borowski and the paintings of Arnold Daghani This Way For The Gas bears explosive witness to shape the pulse of that post-Holocaust world. Bill Smith, Angi Mariano and their colleagues have wrought an enormous service. In the last great reprise of 'Never' we realise we're seeing the finale of an emerging masterpiece.


Review: The Yellow Wallpaper

Stephanie Mohr’s adaptation is a remarkable manifestation (no other word seems more apt) of the Charlotte Perkins Gilman short story The Yellow Wallpaper, an important realisation of a key feminist awakening. It’s good enough for you not to want it depicted in any other way.


Review: The Father and the Assassin

There’s no finer dramatization of India’s internal conflicts. Hiran Abeysekera’s Gandhi-killer Godse stands out in this thrilling ensemble and storms it too.


Review: Yours Unfaithfully

In Miles Malleson’s play, full of probing discussions, there’s a refusal to tilt at solutions. You feel he’s lived along the line; his provisionality speaks with permanence. That’s what makes it so remarkable.


Review: Under the Kunde Tree

There’s much to learn here, and as theatrical spectacle this is the intimate intimating the epic. Clarisse Makundul has given us a powerful work, and I’d urge you to see it.


Review: Il Burattino

An Italian soldier at the eastern front


Review: Lovefool

Though it might be red-topped as a Fleabag for the abused, it’s so much more excoriating. It’s also a work profoundly moving, necessary and – particularly for Gintare Parulyte - an act of courage. Lovefool’s on till May 26th; do rush to this 55-minute must-see.


Review: You Bury Me

An essential play so rich in its one-hour-forty you emerge dazed with possibilities. Director Katie Posner hopes it’ll change you. So do I.


Review: Pussycat in Memory of Darkness

Neda Nezhdana’s play is a world: not simply a map of pain and war footage. Both essential and in the mesmerising Kristin Millward’s and Polly Creed’s hands, with this team, it’s almost a compulsory visit.


Review: Django in Pain

Poignant, charming and meaningful play that is imaginative and vibrant in vision and message.


Review: Dinner With Groucho

McGuinness produces one of his finest works wrought from the sawdust of others and rendered it the burst of stars that irradiate the end.


Review: Silence

More of a scattering of earth, ashes and love than simply groundbreaking. But caveats aside, groundbreaking it is.


Review: Ballet Freedom

Contemporary dance, excellent dancers, eclectic music, sexy choreography.


Review: Tea Ceremony

A meaningful provocative story in an unexpected setting.


Review: Circus Abyssinia: Tulu

Vibrant music, excellent acrobatic skills, fast paced with colourful lights and costumes!


Review: Comoedia

Classic Commedia Dell’arte in a contemporary venue with traditional values.


Review: Mary, Chris, Mars

Imaginative - and will appeal to families with an interest in space, astronauts and object/shadow puppetry.


Review: The Father and the Assassin

There’s no finer dramatisation of India’s internal conflicts. Shubham Saraf’s Gandhi-killer Godse stands out in this thrilling ensemble and storms it too.


Review: Rice

Do see this work of understated virtuosity, rich in character, substance, a shape-shifting singularity.


Review: Mary Stuart

A new take on Schiller’s play that removes the men and truly heightens the drama.


Review: Misfits

An important play, tackling the deadly serious with laughter that all too easily could lead to stark tragedy.


Review: Troy Story

Again the most educative stand-up and a thrilling presentation. Oh and bloody funny on war, male sexuality and the Bechdel Test.


Review: The Sensemaker

An astonishing, disturbing shapeshifting sliver of genius.


Review: Two Horsemen

The glaring energy of this piece can’t disguise how it strikes profundity in its funny-bone.


Review: Frankenstein

Imaginative, Exquisitely Haunting and Moving - Visual Storytelling at its best!


Review: Les Blancs

A superb realization of Lorraine Hansberry's unfinished masterpiece - a classic of Ibsenite proportions


Review: Amsterdam

Did I say sucker-punch? It’s what the Orange Tree do every time.


Review: The Tin Drum

Nico Holonics’ blaze-through avatar is unlikely to be surpassed.


Review: Three Sisters

This spectacular production beats with a fervour and purpose few adaptations achieve. Ellams has made Three Sisters new.


Review: Hunger

An exemplary, scrupulous production so starkly contemporary, it makes Hunger contemporary forever


Review: #We Are Arrested

Peter Hamilton Dyer carries this celebration of the conscience to be fully human


Review: Monster

A highly inventive look at life with visuals, dance and an assault on your senses.


Review: Taboo

A chilling glimpse into the world of a little known but influential woman from the Nazi era.


Review: The Hunt

An outstandingly theatrical re-visioning of a film


Review: The Flies

There’s nothing like the Exchange’s approach: their bi-lingual virtuosity burns questions.


Review: White Pearl

The finest new play from the Court this year, gleaming and deadly


Review: Pah-La

A searing arc of a drama based on true events


Review: Underground Railroad Game

The most radical piece of American theatre I’ve seen, and certainly the bravest. See it.


Review: De Fuut

Disturbing look into the mind of a paedophile


Review: HUFF

A gut-wrenching tale of Indigenous brothers caught in a torrent of solvent abuse in the wake of the death of their mother.


Review: The Fishermen

A Traumatic But Transformational Fight For Life, Freedom, and Understanding


Review: Huff

Heart-breaking, darkly comic and beautifully performed


Review: £¥€$ (Lies)

By the end of this you’ll know far more about the banking sector than even Robert Peston explains. Now go and play them for a fool.


Review: Exit the King

We need such risk-taking theatre back. This outstanding production of Exit the King might just remind us how to get it.


Review: In the Night Time (Before the Sun Rises)

This production’s sheer inventiveness, the feral truth of the acting and fabulously exploding set surely reinvent something; and land this drama where it should be: in the bleak dark before a bleached-out dawn.


Review: Lonely Planet

If you know Angels in America, you’ll be grateful for Dietz’s concentration and economy. Much reckoning is packed into a little room.


Review: Utility

It’s a great phase of U. S. playwrighting, driven by women, and we’re lucky to be living in the middle of it. Schwend unleashes unexpected miracles and is one reason to see this hushed superlative of a play.


Review: Act and Terminal 3

everything – set, actors, script – come mesmerizingly and painfully together.


Review: Bus Boy

What Journeys Do We Have To Take To Appease The Beast Within?


Review: Arr We There Yet?

A Madcap Mashup of Circus and Storytelling with a Little Tango for Extra Spice


Review: De Fuut

A profoundly disturbing updating of 'Lolita'


Review: My Father Held A Gun

"A passionate, storytelling show with live cinematic music about war and peace, acts of heroism, and the love for life."


Review: Medea

A twentieth century adaption by Jean Anouilh


Review: Moormaid

Bott asks serious questions. How can a terrorist redeem themselves, and how do individuals negotiate this? Can art play any part in rehabilitation?


Review: The Gulf

Gould’s team have made this as authentic as some of U. S. casts who travelled over from The New York Public Theater for the Nelson plays. There’ll always be some who don’t get this kind of theatre, but there’s an increasing appetite for and understanding of it. When you do, like Kendra’s Betty, you’ll be hooked.


Review: This Restless State

If it comes near you – visit the website – do try and see this pungently-paced meditation on upheaval. This Restless State breathes across its zones as a play with real potential that simply needs a little more daring, a little less peeling back.


Review: Rambert

The theatre of Goat, its apotheosis into something else from its comedic opening, is stunning. It’s what the Rambert does; completely reinvent itself and the dance. this and the earlier ballet are outstanding in themselves. The Cunningham company are lucky to learn from them.


Review: The Great Wave

Turnly’s straightforward play treats of a history we’re unfamiliar with, and we need it straight. That’s more than enough to make it thoroughly absorbing, with far more questions than when we entered the space. Do see it.


Review: Grimly Handsome

If you want theatre to change your life a little and wonder where our DNA and urges trek to, you could do infinitely worse than shiver here.


Review: Barber Shop Chronicles

Barber Shop Chronicles is a breath-taking revelation for those of us who had small inkling of a world in miniature. The act of barbering is more than an exchange of service with fringe benefits: it’s a profound act of human adjustment, including that vital glance in the mirror.