Review: Rice

Do see this work of understated virtuosity, rich in character, substance, a shape-shifting singularity.


Review: Looking Good Dead

A first-rate production. If you enjoy thrillers, you must see this.


Review: Is God Is

A stunning, preternaturally timed production


Review: What If If Only

Churchill’s anatomy of grief is what abides. Its emotional plangency and pulling the future open is unique.


Review: Steam

There’s a grain in this play promising the transcendent.


Review: Mozzzi

Then it was DDT. Now it’s personal.


Review: Walden

Amy Berryman’s Walden is a remarkable play where the earth itself’s at the cross-planet, and travellers in space have inner and outer choices.


Review: I/O

Interesting exploration of movement, technology and space.


Review: Mary Stuart

A new take on Schiller’s play that removes the men and truly heightens the drama.


Review: Distance Remaining

A quirky film, beautifully acted about three separate lives.


Review: Paradise

A sleeping classic in the making


Review: Language Games

A quirky and delightful play of language and ideas in a short film depicting 4 characters in philosophical conversation (overseen by a giant, verbal rabbit).


Review: The Twits

A summer must-see to charge you up for the autumn, and taking on the real twits ahead.


Review: Bones and Wires

Exploration of contrasts, curious, subtle and meaningful.


Review: Misfits

An important play, tackling the deadly serious with laughter that all too easily could lead to stark tragedy.


Review: Saviour

A remarkable one-person play, performed to literal fever pitch by its creator.


Review: On Arriving

On Arriving takes sixty minutes it seems we’ve been immersed in a Greek Tragedy of ninety. See it.


Review: Last Easter

After all the uproar, it’s a quiet blinder.


Review: and breathe…

Yomi Sode’s hybrid theatre is a compelling immersion of witness and poetry: we need more of it.


Review: Branching Out

Three very fine and one outstanding work, Scratches – the best kind of play on depression, self-harm, black holes. Because it’s screamingly funny and deeply connected to why we do theatre.


Review: You

‘YOU’ is about loss and the way it has shaped Kathleen's life.


Review: Leaves

This haunting 45-minute tale is a superb small gem from Jermyn Street’s Footprints Festival.


Review: Sitting Pretty

When you see this show return, it’ll be outstanding, and in the frame for awards.


Review: The Vertical Hour

The definitive Fringe revival of a mainstream play this year. Absorbing, baggy, intimate. See it.


Review: Push and Pull

A quietly thrilling evening, after it goes off with a bang and a bear.


Review: Two Horsemen

The glaring energy of this piece can’t disguise how it strikes profundity in its funny-bone.


Review: Hole

Don’t miss the chance to see this transcendent actor prove she possesses another dimension altogether.


Review: Sacrament

A revelation, superbly written and acted. Comparisons have been made with A Girl Is A Half-formed Thing. I can think of no higher praise either. You must see this.


Review: Living Newspaper #7

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch a group of young dramatists take on the future


Review: Illusions of Liberty

A finely-calibrated solo play of what it’s like to enter that tunnel of near-undiagnosable but very real illness. Corinne Walker’s both authoritative and quicksilver. Do catch it.


Review: Vespertilio

Vespertilio marks Barry McStay’s emergence as a writer of distinction. Anything he writes now should be looked out for.


Review: Jew… ish

One of the wittiest but also truthful comedies about love, identity, sexual politics and gefilte fish I’ve seen


Review: Living Newspaper #6

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch what this does with the future


Review: Living Newspaper #5

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch.


Review: Outside

As with Inside, Outside not only fits us, they help us to move on, and become in their modest, unassuming and utterly transcendent way, part of how we learn to.


Review: New Moon Monologues April

As we saw in March, don’t be lulled by friendly colours and fluffy fonts. Queens of Cups again proves they’re a company to revel with and wait for heart-stopping reveals


Review: Icarus

After all the gods and their lack of choice, we come to the final instalment, the human dimension. Where we have one. A heartfelt, satisfying finish.


Review: Aphrodite

Dazzling: wise, clever twists about choice, male determination, and consequence.


Review: Pygmalion

The most profound reinvention of this particular myth I’ve seen


Review: Orpheus

A terrific reinvention, bringing gods and heroines up from the death of myth to an altered world.


Review: Persephone

Dazzling: wise, clever twists about choice, male determination, and consequence.


Review: Inside

They’re live. And Orange Tree. Catch them.


Review: New Moon Monologues March

Don’t be lulled by the friendly colours and fluffy fonts. Queen of Cups is absolutely a company to watch, and its showcase productions are literally unmissable


Review: Adventurous

A play gently subverting all expectations. Feeling Adventurous? You should.


Review: Typical

How British society stereotypes Black masculinity.


Review: Plays for Today

A truly absorbing series. And free to stream on Soundcloud.


Review: Hymn

Its potency lies in a fine peeling apart by Adrian Lester and Danny Sapini, and the language that bridges it.


Review: Before After

A pristine, heartwarming Valentine of a musical, starring a pair of real-life lovers, it deserves a real-life run


Review: Shook

If you’ve an appetite for exceptional new writing, just see it.


Review: Walk of Shame

A slow burning expose of the shame we should feel at how we treat those who exercise the liberty we expect them to have


Review: Public Domain

At 65 minutes it’s worth anyone’s time and emphatically money.


Review: Just Like Giving Blood

Upton’s notches of logic are nudged with brilliance, the actual narrative a granular run-up to an enormous yes.


Review: The White Hart

Winner of an OnComm award from Off West End, another Upton triumph by stealth


Review: Nine Lessons and Carols

The Almeida’s another country. They do shows differently there. A bold communing of theatre stories with the fresh poignancy of what’s happened during 2020


Review: Death of England: Delroy

Renders huge black experience into a narrative that bears it, because so well-constructed, so character-driven and so inhabited by Michael Balogun whose blaze of awakening is both benediction and clarion.


Review: Metamorphosis

Compelling devised theatre - creative, dynamic and humourous!


Review: The New Tomorrow

There’s a generosity here, a big hug. Theatre itself affirms the value of life to those who might yet shape it for the better.


Review: Crave

One of the most important productions since lockdown.


Review: Love Love Love

Epic eavesdropping casts that ultimate spell: reading ourselves by flashes of lightning.


Review: Inside This Box

Showcases future names and above all is defiant with hope and agency


Review: Shoe Lady

Katherine Parkinson inhabits that breaking through the office crust asphyxiating us


Review: The Ruins of Empires

A fantastical run through the falls of Empires and how we, as subjects, can and should rise up and take the advantages back for the common good.


Review: Barber Shop Chronicles

Barber Shop Chronicles is a breath-taking revelation for those of us who had small inkling of a world in miniature.


Review: A Separate Peace

Stoppard looks at society’s phantom limb ethic. Even when it’s gone it aches, and it aches to have someone opting out.


Review: Tiger Country

Tells us more truthfully then any play has, the heroism that hardens, the sacrifice that endures.


Review: Cyprus Avenue

Devastating drama about the DNA of bigotry played as surreal farce.


Review: Wild

Theatrically the most thrilling end to any Bartlett play


Review: I and You

Will leave you in a heap and wonder what else Lauren Gunderson has written that comes near this.


Review: Maim

A hymnotic theatrical panic for the land, which exposes us to the language and the lyrical beauty of our own country.


Review: Quartet

Like The French Lieutenant’s Woman, there are now two endings to Quartet. You must see this if you know the film only, or care about music, ageing, friendship and achingly lost love.


Review: Shoe Lady

Katherine Parkinson inhabits that breaking through the office crust asphyxiating us