Review: Middle

Judging by the audience, its bleakness tells. Middle bears its own epiphany.


Review: Orlando

A gem of a production, Taylor McClaine a soaring talent to watch.


Review: The Homecoming

Simply put: go see this if you’ve any feeling for postwar drama. It’s theatre on the rack and do we need it!


Review: The Misfortune of the English

Pamela Carter’s schoolboys embody human connectedness, warmth, a final camaraderie before the chill of history. Unmissable.


Review: The Corn is Green

There’s many reasons to see Williams’ finest play. To realise our potential it’s not enough to have dreams, but for someone to show us what those dreams could be.


Review: The Rise and Fall of Little Voice

The Rise and Fall of Little Voice sings out of damage into heartbreak and redemption. Those who don’t know the play or its outcome should see this, even those who have.


Review: How It Is Part 2

Immersive, outstanding, unrepeatable and unimaginable anywhere else


Review: Henry V

The definitive Henry V of our time


Review: The Paradis Files

Not so much an event as a concentration of Errollyn Wallen’s genius celebrating the life of blind composer Maria Theresia van Paradis, in Graeae’s world-class production


Review: Private Lives

Private Lives can never disappoint: it plays itself and as far as it’s a work of verbal tennis this production won’t pall either


Review: Tom Fool

Pitch-perfect and compelling. Sometimes knowing your prison walls too much can drive you mad.


Review: Hamlet

A great Hamlet almost realised


Review: The Merchant of Venice

A reading of Adrian Schiller’s Shylock as probing as other great productions of the past decade; and of Sophie Melville’s nearly-rounded, brittle Portia.


Review: Beautiful

Outstanding, and outstandingly transferred as a tour that brings its stature with it.


Review: When We Dead Awaken

Ibsen’s elusive masterpiece is so rarely performed seeing it is an imperative. Played with such authority as here, in Norwegian and English, it’s not a luxury but a must-see.


Review: An Hour and a Half Late

Don’t miss this authentic, touching, devastatingly comic anatomy of a marriage as soufflé, supremely served by Rhys-Jones and Dee.


Review: The Da Vinci Code

Actually improves on Brown with theatrical humour and bold gestures; with a set that tells the story almost as much as the strong cast.


Review: Two Billion Beats

Two Billion Beats was bursting with promise before. Now it delivers with a visceral yes.


Review: Measure for Measure

Immerse yourself in Blanche McIntyre’s quizzical production. You’ll come nearer to this play.


Review: The Tempest

Do see this Tempest, not only subtly outstanding, but pulsing with human connectivity and warmth.


Review: Rocky Horror Show

Absolutely worth seeing however many times you have already


Review: Groan Ups

Just wait for the second act.


Review: The Play That Goes Wrong

A play about amateurs no amateur company should even dare contemplate. There’s genius in the timing of all this. Outstanding.


Review: Footfalls & Rockaby

Charlotte Emmerson and Sian Phillips make their parts indelible, and add to Beckett’s stock of pity, stoicism and a window on death. Outstanding.


Review: The Cat and the Canary

If you’re a Classic Thriller Theatre Company fan, don’t hesitate. Though we can be grateful to Bill Kenwright for trying out these creaky creepies, a serious bit of thought ought to go in to just what genres they are first.


Review: Hamlet

Jumbo’s Hamlet strips out accretions and ghosts you into asking who or what Hamlet is. See it if you possibly can.


Review: Macbeth

Building out of Macbeth a recurring epic of structural violence not ended with one overthrow, sets the seal on this outstanding production.


Review: Heathers

Sometimes the dark is light enough. Meanwhile enjoy an exceptional cast and talent you’ll long to see again in something finer.


Review: Metamorphoses

The overriding sense, not surprisingly with these actors, is joy.


Review: A Splinter of Ice

Absorbing. With such an acting masterclass the play’s a bewitchingly-voiced fugue on the limits of belief and betrayal.


Review: The Normal Heart

An outstanding revival. If you see one play this autumn, make it this one.


Review: Rice

Do see this work of understated virtuosity, rich in character, substance, a shape-shifting singularity.


Review: Looking Good Dead

A first-rate production. If you enjoy thrillers, you must see this.


Review: Relatively Speaking

With his new production director Robin Herford, most associated with this play, brings pace, panache, and more than a dose of Ayckbourn’s generosity of spirit


Review: Is God Is

A stunning, preternaturally timed production


Review: What If If Only

Churchill’s anatomy of grief is what abides. Its emotional plangency and pulling the future open is unique.


Review: Leopoldstat

Stoppard’s written out his theatrical testament. Outstanding.


Review: The Dresser

If you’ve not seen The Dresser, you shouldn’t pass up this production.


Review: The Midnight Bell

An outstanding ballet by any standards. One that like its inspiration Patrick Hamilton will last.


Review: Twelfth Night

With Michelle Terry as Viola, one of the most touching and truthful Twelfth Nights I’ve seen.


Review: Romeo and Juliet

A fleet, brilliantly upending, wholly relevant take on the Verona-ready toxicity feeding male violence and young depression


Review: Dirty Dancing

There’s a fitting heart-warming climax to a dream of production. And a surprise to those who think they know the film.


Review: This Beautiful Future

Heartstopping. There’s an absoluteness here we need. We must prove desperate for it or die ourselves.


Review: Paradise

A sleeping classic in the making


Review: Six

Outstanding, the finest West End musical for years


Review: The Odyssey

As spellbinding as Circe and Calypso in one


Review: Sweet William

Naturally enriched by living with Shakespeare Michael Pennington unearths local habitations and names for him.


Review: Troy Story

Again the most educative stand-up and a thrilling presentation. Oh and bloody funny on war, male sexuality and the Bechdel Test.


Review: Saviour

A remarkable one-person play, performed to literal fever pitch by its creator.


Review: Tom Lehrer

Another sovereign tribute. Stefan Bednarczyk brings Tom Lehrer swaggering out of retirement.  


Review: Mr and Mrs Nobody

A warm-hearted yet sharp-witted peek at how the Pooter half live


Review: On Arriving

On Arriving takes sixty minutes it seems we’ve been immersed in a Greek Tragedy of ninety. See it.


Review: Last Easter

After all the uproar, it’s a quiet blinder.


Review: and breathe…

Yomi Sode’s hybrid theatre is a compelling immersion of witness and poetry: we need more of it.


Review: Staircase

A first-rate revival of a play that with its ostensible shock-value in aspic, reveals subversions and a clever structure so unsettling we should all look in the mirror and wince.


Review: Branching Out

Three very fine and one outstanding work, Scratches – the best kind of play on depression, self-harm, black holes. Because it’s screamingly funny and deeply connected to why we do theatre.


Review: You

‘YOU’ is about loss and the way it has shaped Kathleen's life.


Review: Leaves

This haunting 45-minute tale is a superb small gem from Jermyn Street’s Footprints Festival.


Review: Eng-er-Land

Writer/performer Hannah Kumari leaves you alert and exhilarated


Review: Lone Flyer

An absorbing drama, absorbingly acted and produced.


Review: Romantics

As ever consummate, fine performances, and probing memorably into women Romantic poets


Review: Dazzling Divas

Issy Van Randwyck brings seven divas to life in this paean to tragic fulfilment.


Review: The Mahabharata

A dramatic sense of arrival the way the Odyssey here ended: a clash of even vaster ferocity, keening, treachery, humour, mischievousness, sacrifice and grief, joy and the agency of women.


Review: Metaphysicals

A cross between cheerfully-spun recital and quicksilver treasury


Review: Push and Pull

A quietly thrilling evening, after it goes off with a bang and a bear.


Review: Shaw Shorts

A joyous, heady and oh-so-welcome return to this intimate yet high-kicking theatre. An absolute must-see.