Review: A Splinter of Ice

Absorbing. With such an acting masterclass the play’s a bewitchingly-voiced fugue on the limits of belief and betrayal.


Review: The Normal Heart

An outstanding revival. If you see one play this autumn, make it this one.


Review: Rice

Do see this work of understated virtuosity, rich in character, substance, a shape-shifting singularity.


Review: Looking Good Dead

A first-rate production. If you enjoy thrillers, you must see this.


Review: Relatively Speaking

With his new production director Robin Herford, most associated with this play, brings pace, panache, and more than a dose of Ayckbourn’s generosity of spirit


Review: Is God Is

A stunning, preternaturally timed production


Review: What If If Only

Churchill’s anatomy of grief is what abides. Its emotional plangency and pulling the future open is unique.


Review: Leopoldstat

Stoppard’s written out his theatrical testament. Outstanding.


Review: The Dresser

If you’ve not seen The Dresser, you shouldn’t pass up this production.


Review: The Midnight Bell

An outstanding ballet by any standards. One that like its inspiration Patrick Hamilton will last.


Review: Twelfth Night

With Michelle Terry as Viola, one of the most touching and truthful Twelfth Nights I’ve seen.


Review: Romeo and Juliet

A fleet, brilliantly upending, wholly relevant take on the Verona-ready toxicity feeding male violence and young depression


Review: Dirty Dancing

There’s a fitting heart-warming climax to a dream of production. And a surprise to those who think they know the film.


Review: This Beautiful Future

Heartstopping. There’s an absoluteness here we need. We must prove desperate for it or die ourselves.


Review: Paradise

A sleeping classic in the making


Review: Six

Outstanding, the finest West End musical for years


Review: The Odyssey

As spellbinding as Circe and Calypso in one


Review: Sweet William

Naturally enriched by living with Shakespeare Michael Pennington unearths local habitations and names for him.


Review: Troy Story

Again the most educative stand-up and a thrilling presentation. Oh and bloody funny on war, male sexuality and the Bechdel Test.


Review: Saviour

A remarkable one-person play, performed to literal fever pitch by its creator.


Review: Tom Lehrer

Another sovereign tribute. Stefan Bednarczyk brings Tom Lehrer swaggering out of retirement.  


Review: Mr and Mrs Nobody

A warm-hearted yet sharp-witted peek at how the Pooter half live


Review: On Arriving

On Arriving takes sixty minutes it seems we’ve been immersed in a Greek Tragedy of ninety. See it.


Review: Last Easter

After all the uproar, it’s a quiet blinder.


Review: and breathe…

Yomi Sode’s hybrid theatre is a compelling immersion of witness and poetry: we need more of it.


Review: Staircase

A first-rate revival of a play that with its ostensible shock-value in aspic, reveals subversions and a clever structure so unsettling we should all look in the mirror and wince.


Review: Branching Out

Three very fine and one outstanding work, Scratches – the best kind of play on depression, self-harm, black holes. Because it’s screamingly funny and deeply connected to why we do theatre.


Review: You

‘YOU’ is about loss and the way it has shaped Kathleen's life.


Review: Leaves

This haunting 45-minute tale is a superb small gem from Jermyn Street’s Footprints Festival.


Review: Eng-er-Land

Writer/performer Hannah Kumari leaves you alert and exhilarated


Review: Lone Flyer

An absorbing drama, absorbingly acted and produced.


Review: Romantics

As ever consummate, fine performances, and probing memorably into women Romantic poets


Review: Dazzling Divas

Issy Van Randwyck brings seven divas to life in this paean to tragic fulfilment.


Review: The Mahabharata

A dramatic sense of arrival the way the Odyssey here ended: a clash of even vaster ferocity, keening, treachery, humour, mischievousness, sacrifice and grief, joy and the agency of women.


Review: Metaphysicals

A cross between cheerfully-spun recital and quicksilver treasury


Review: Push and Pull

A quietly thrilling evening, after it goes off with a bang and a bear.


Review: Shaw Shorts

A joyous, heady and oh-so-welcome return to this intimate yet high-kicking theatre. An absolute must-see.


Review: Two Horsemen

The glaring energy of this piece can’t disguise how it strikes profundity in its funny-bone.


Review: Hole

Don’t miss the chance to see this transcendent actor prove she possesses another dimension altogether.


Review: Anton Chekhov

The nearest we’ll come to meeting Chekhov. In Pennington’s masterclass.


Review: Living Newspaper #7

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch a group of young dramatists take on the future


Review: Living Newspaper #6

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch what this does with the future


Review: Living Newspaper #5

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch.


Review: Outside

As with Inside, Outside not only fits us, they help us to move on, and become in their modest, unassuming and utterly transcendent way, part of how we learn to.


Review: Inside

They’re live. And Orange Tree. Catch them.


Review: Adventurous

A play gently subverting all expectations. Feeling Adventurous? You should.


Review: Hymn

Its potency lies in a fine peeling apart by Adrian Lester and Danny Sapini, and the language that bridges it.


Review: Shook

If you’ve an appetite for exceptional new writing, just see it.


Review: Public Domain

At 65 minutes it’s worth anyone’s time and emphatically money.


Review: Nine Lessons and Carols

The Almeida’s another country. They do shows differently there. A bold communing of theatre stories with the fresh poignancy of what’s happened during 2020


Review: Death of England: Delroy

Renders huge black experience into a narrative that bears it, because so well-constructed, so character-driven and so inhabited by Michael Balogun whose blaze of awakening is both benediction and clarion.


Review: The New Tomorrow

There’s a generosity here, a big hug. Theatre itself affirms the value of life to those who might yet shape it for the better.


Review: Uncle Vanya

The definitive Vanya for our times


Review: Crave

One of the most important productions since lockdown.


Review: Love Love Love

Epic eavesdropping casts that ultimate spell: reading ourselves by flashes of lightning.


Review: Amadeus

In the most spectacular production imaginable, Lucian Msamati’s supremely crafted lead sets off the quicksilver of his rival Adam Gillen.


Review: Inside This Box

Showcases future names and above all is defiant with hope and agency


Review: The Deep Blue Sea

Helen McCrory plumbs the erotic despair of Hester Collyer’s abandoned woman in this absorbing revival of Rattigan’s masterpiece.


Review: Shoe Lady

Katherine Parkinson inhabits that breaking through the office crust asphyxiating us


Review: Les Blancs

A superb realization of Lorraine Hansberry's unfinished masterpiece - a classic of Ibsenite proportions


Review: Small Island

A reboot for the future, a passport for change.