Review: Walden

Amy Berryman’s Walden is a remarkable play where the earth itself’s at the cross-planet, and travellers in space have inner and outer choices.


Review: Catching Comets

This was a solo performance telling a story about love, about fear, about the protections that we build up around ourselves that isolate us more than they serve.


Review: Dark Sublime

Renders complex sexual feeling and friendship with the grace of the everyday


Review: Tiptree

Written and performed by Jenny Rowe


Review: Quintessence

There’s a superb cliff-edge to this outstanding production.


Review: One Woman Alien

I can predict that by the end of its run, this should be the most outstanding one-person show you’ll see in the last week.


Review: Pigspurt’s Daughter

Guardian obituary, 2008. ‘Ken Campbell was one of the most original and unclassifiable talents in British theatre of the past half-century.’ It just happens that his daughter Daisy is both that and far more. She’s one of the most cunning crafters of comedy and storytelling in the anti-business


Review: The Twilight Zone

I’d like to see a more thorough-going homage to Serling’s work in particular and it’s good he’s at least well-represented here. His acute questioning, exploration of a more human agency and refusal to play too much with inexplicable spectacle marks him out as a more earthy but far more imaginative writer too. His stories are still absolutely contemporary ones: the others have dated as the future often does.


Review: Earthquakes in London

Cast and crew are beyond praise. It’s quite possibly the finest production of this huge, skirling ride of a play that’s ever been mounted. Outstanding.


Review: Sanctuary

A tight package of scientific intrigue and emotional rawness


Review: The Time Machine

An excellently executed journey into the future


Review: A Void

"For those seeking new and original plays this Fringe season, A Void is a must for your list"


Review: Turbulence

Musical Improv troupe keep improving.


Review: Model Organisms

Donkin’s artistry as writer isn’t in doubt, and Newton-Mountney’s performance is compelling. This is eminently worth seeing especially if you like dystopian narratives of the possible near-present. The story’s complete, but this journey’s just begun.


Review: H. P. Lovecraft’s Pickman’s Model

A fine adaptation of a classic 1926 pulp horror tale from H. P. Lovecraft. Be prepared for subtle creeping horror late at night when Thurber befriends the brilliant but horribly morbid painter Pickman, and is invited to his 1690s studio.