Review: Vanya

This is the greatest one-man performance I’ve seen, said a Chekhov-immersed director of 45 years’ experience next to me. Yes.


Review: Boy In Da Korma

A necessary, engaging, original variation on finding your voice: and a theatrical coup. Acting, writing, directing, video, lighting and tech support, indeed singing are first class. A gem.


Review: Cold War

Cold War ends with a draining-out of hope in Anya Chalotra and Luke Thallon; a desolate beauty the cast certainly earn.


Review: The House of Bernarda Alba

Adaptor Alice Birch takes the House apart like Rachel Whiteread’s sculpture. Harriet Walter is magnificent: staring out like a jailor, patrolling. Hainsworth remains hypnotic and terrible, joyously sexual and headlong as her Juliet in self-destruction.


Review: Ghosts

Tom Hill-Gibbins emphasises the original’s shock in conversational prose-style too. Stripped to a straight-through 100 minutes is hurtles like the Greek tragedy with reveals it essentially is.


Review: This Way For The Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen

Based on the writing of poet Tadeusz Borowski and the paintings of Arnold Daghani This Way For The Gas bears explosive witness to shape the pulse of that post-Holocaust world. Bill Smith, Angi Mariano and their colleagues have wrought an enormous service. In the last great reprise of 'Never' we realise we're seeing the finale of an emerging masterpiece.


Review: Accidental Death of an Anarchist

The adage that farce is tragedy speeded up met its greatest progenitor in Dario Fo. In a ferocious new version by Tom Basden of Franca Rame’s and Fo’s Accidental Death of an Anarchist, directed by Daniel Raggett in a stunning production now at the Haymarket, the target here is squarely the London Met. And if you slowed down Basden’s brilliant, no-holds-unbludgeoned telling, details prove tragic enough.


Review: La Codista

A professional queuer tells her tale


Review: Can’t Pay? Won’t Pay!

A cost-of-living revolution in St James Street? You’d better believe it as Triada Theatre kick off the weekend with Dario Fo’s 1974 Can’t Pay? Won’t Pay! at the Lantern Theatre. Superb, energised theatre, rough occasionally, but mostly very-well performed, imaginatively staged, rapturously received. Now get out on the streets.


Review: Moby Dick

It's hard to distinguish puppet from human in a spectacular retelling of Moby Dick.


Review: Lovefool

Though it might be red-topped as a Fleabag for the abused, it’s so much more excoriating. It’s also a work profoundly moving, necessary and – particularly for Gintare Parulyte - an act of courage. Lovefool’s on till May 26th; do rush to this 55-minute must-see.


Review: Anna & Marina

Dovetailing invention and quotation triumphs. It’s a narrative of thrust and weave as well as tone. Overall it's terrific: one of Richard Crane’s very best works. If you care for gripping drama, can be drawn by hypnotic verse and superb acting, haste over to this unique hour.


Review: And Then They Came For Me

A multi-genre piece that can play anywhere, and needed now more than ever. Both to challenge denialists and most of all to illustrate the inhumanity of governments like ours towards refugees


Review: Pussycat in Memory of Darkness

Neda Nezhdana’s play is a world: not simply a map of pain and war footage. Both essential and in the mesmerising Kristin Millward’s and Polly Creed’s hands, with this team, it’s almost a compulsory visit.


Review: Dance of Death

A hectic in the blood of 20th century drama. Its just here the hectic is realised like never before.


Review: The Journey to Venice

Wiebke Green possesses the measure and tempo as well as delicacy of Bjorn Vik’s work. An exquisite gem worth seeing more than many larger, longer, louder shows.


Review: Sarah

An unnerving testing of that space between naturalism and hallucination, redemption and blank unknowing, studded with a language that flies off the page.


Review: The Doctor

A triumph for all concerned. Juliet Stevenson even gains in stature. Robert Icke’s revival could hardly go better than this.


Review: The Dance of Death

Highlights the truth of its bleak laughter. Humane Strindberg. Now there’s a thing.


Review: God of Carnage

Acting here is tighter than any version I’ve seen. This revival of a modern classic has to be the best of the Fringe so far.


Review: How It Is Part 2

Immersive, outstanding, unrepeatable and unimaginable anywhere else


Review: Tom Fool

Pitch-perfect and compelling. Sometimes knowing your prison walls too much can drive you mad.


Review: When We Dead Awaken

Ibsen’s elusive masterpiece is so rarely performed seeing it is an imperative. Played with such authority as here, in Norwegian and English, it’s not a luxury but a must-see.


Review: An Hour and a Half Late

Don’t miss this authentic, touching, devastatingly comic anatomy of a marriage as soufflé, supremely served by Rhys-Jones and Dee.


Review: Paradise

A sleeping classic in the making


Review: Miss Julie

The end is like life-blood draining away. It’s what Strindberg meant. See it.


Review: The Sensemaker

An astonishing, disturbing shapeshifting sliver of genius.


Review: Living Newspaper #6

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch what this does with the future


Review: Amsterdam

Did I say sucker-punch? It’s what the Orange Tree do every time.


Review: The Metamorphosis

An original, vibrant and contemporarily relevant, fantastic adaptation of a classic text.


Review: The Visit

Kushner’s just brought The Visit home with him.


Review: The Tin Drum

Nico Holonics’ blaze-through avatar is unlikely to be surpassed.


Review: #We Are Arrested

Peter Hamilton Dyer carries this celebration of the conscience to be fully human


Review: Shadows

Speaks with a fierce innocence


Review: Blood Wedding

In several ways, this is about as good as it gets.


Review: Amsterdam

Did I say sucker-punch? It’s what the Orange Tree do every time.


Review: The Doctor

A triumph for all concerned. Juliet Stevenson even gains in stature. Icke’s last production could hardly go better than this.


Review: Taboo

A chilling glimpse into the world of a little known but influential woman from the Nazi era.


Review: Rosmersholm

They compel attention, they demand we follow every sigh


Review: Creditors

We’re unlikely to see a better production of this still rarely-performed disturber of ourselves.


Review: Miss Julie

It’s unlikely we’ll get a cleaner version, or a more absorbing production any time soon


Review: The Father

Florian Zeller's masterpiece, in a production and central performance that would do it justice anywhere.


Review: Another One

An impressive physical theatre piece that does seem to meander round a lack of connection.


Review: Infinita

Bittersweet slapstick comedy about the cycle of life