FringeReview UK

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FringeReview UK 2022

A Doll’s House Part 2

The best Part 2 we can imagine.


All Of Us

As Ken Tynan once said of another debut, I don’t think I could love someone who doesn’t love this play.


Caesar and Cleopatra

It’s like being illumined from a trip-light.


Cancelling Socrates

Howard Brenton touching eighty is at the height of his powers. Tom Littler has assembled a pitch-perfect cast, reuniting two from his outstanding All’s Well. This too.


For Black Boys Who Have Considered Suicide When the Hue Gets Too Heavy

Turns the bleakness of six young men into a celebration of – for now – coming through


Hamlet

A great Hamlet almost realised


Henry V

The definitive Henry V of our time


House of Shades

There’ll be nothing more blazing or relevant on the London stage this year.


How It Is Part 2

Immersive, outstanding, unrepeatable and unimaginable anywhere else


Jitney

Some outstanding acting; necessary, a must-see


Julius Caesar

If you’re a habitual groundling, go before this production vanishes back on tour


King Lear

Rarely has a Cordelia and Fool scaled such equal terms with such a Lear, rendering a kind of infinity.


Middle

Judging by the audience, its bleakness tells. Middle bears its own epiphany.


Orlando

A gem of a production, Taylor McClaine a soaring talent to watch.


Patriots

Putin’s our monster too. A must-see.


Prima Facie

if Comer doesn’t receive awards for this there’s no justice at all.


Shake the City

A real play bursting out of its hour-plus length; with complex interaction, uncertain journeys, each character developing a crisis of isolation only resolved by sisterhood


Storming!

Stands alone, a wholly original twist to a growing alarm-bell of ethics.


Straight Line Crazy

Danny Webb gives the performance of his life. Ralph Fiennes is coiled majesty. Two-and-a-half hours of such material have rarely been so thrilling.


That Is Not Who I Am

Lucy Kirkwood prophesies what’s in store with savage fury, and no-one’s exempt, least of all her.


The Anarchist

A firecracker of a first play. Expect Molotovs.


The Corn is Green

There’s many reasons to see Williams’ finest play. To realise our potential it’s not enough to have dreams, but for someone to show us what those dreams could be.


The False Servant

It’s not just gender-swerving but role-swerving that threatens sexual and social order. Surprises light up even the last fade.


The Father and the Assassin

There’s no finer dramatisation of India’s internal conflicts. Shubham Saraf’s Gandhi-killer Godse stands out in this thrilling ensemble and storms it too.


The Homecoming

Simply put: go see this if you’ve any feeling for postwar drama. It’s theatre on the rack and do we need it!


The Lesson

Groundbreaking, superb, unmissable.


The Marriage of Alice B. Toklas by Gertrude Stein

Such exquisite works find their time; speak to it again and again and again.


The Merchant of Venice

A reading of Adrian Schiller’s Shylock as probing as other great productions of the past decade; and of Sophie Melville’s nearly-rounded, brittle Portia.


The Misfortune of the English

Pamela Carter’s schoolboys embody human connectedness, warmth, a final camaraderie before the chill of history. Unmissable.


The Poison Belt

So what could a Sussex-based sci-fi tale of 1913 by Conan Doyle – a space-borne poison belt of gas that hits the earth – possibly have to do with the week of the greatest temperatures known in the UK?


The Southbury Child

Perfectly freighted; each character pitched with just enough choice to make us wonder what life, not Stephen Beresford will do with them. Outstanding.


Tom Fool

Pitch-perfect and compelling. Sometimes knowing your prison walls too much can drive you mad.


Turpin

Catch this sharp-witted, reflective, ever-swirling drama from a master storyteller.


Two Billion Beats

Two Billion Beats was bursting with promise before. Now it delivers with a visceral yes.


two Palestinians go dogging

Packs a mighty question that can still knock you off balance.


When We Dead Awaken

Ibsen’s elusive masterpiece is so rarely performed seeing it is an imperative. Played with such authority as here, in Norwegian and English, it’s not a luxury but a must-see.