Review: Algorithms

A bisexual Fleabag for 2024? It’s more than that


Review: Banging Denmark

This production’s 100 minutes are so absorbing you’re not quite sure if the time’s stopped, or just your preconceptions. Stunning, a must see.


Review: Queers

All I can repeat is: see it.


Review: Foam

Scorching script, outstanding acting, particularly by Richards, a must-see.


Review: Turning the Screw

This six-hander is a 90-minute announcement of a major talent. An almost flawless play.


Review: Cowbois

Cranford’s gone Wild West, via the Court and RSC. Cowbois is of course daft. But it’s magnificent in its silliness, contains wonderful – and truthful – moments. Deadly serious can have you rolling in the aisles and still jump up for the revolution.


Review: Jock Night

With one-liners and wit in nearly every exchange, it’s a beautifully-scripted, scream-out affirmation of love, lust, loss and forever’s time being. And built to last.


Review: Purgatorio

Groundhog Day - Saying goodbye to old memories, whilst finding new ones. A beautiful physical representation on our ability to accept who we truly are! Get down to Club Purgatorio!


Review: Salty Irina

Two very different women fall in love and fight the Nazi's


Review: Character Flaw

Heartfelt, connected and more than just a little bit touching, Character Flaw is a train ride you'll be glad you hopped on board for.


Review: Burnt Lavender

Indulgent, decadent, glorious, gorgeous and beautiful anthem to the pride in being yourself.


Review: Poof!

Combining subtlety with an inspirational message, this truly is a bit of magic.


Review: 30 and Out

It’s important Brighton welcomes such terrific all-encompassing shows such as this, sashaying hilarity and superbly-crafted storytelling with dance and poignant witness. You can’t go away a bit unchanged.


Review: Manic

A new solo show that combines puppetry, spoken word and theatre to bring an honest look at sex and trauma to Brighton Fringe 2023


Review: The Way Old Friends Do

In a show celebrating the revival of friendship, twice, through the love of a non-binary ABBA tribute band, it’s good to know who you can rely on. You can rely on this scintillating, bittersweet play too. Absolutely recommended.


Review: No I.D.

The celebration of acceptance and being wholly comfortable in your own body for the first time in your life transmits to everyone. It should make you more comfortable, knowing how Tatenda Shamiso radiates the joy of his, bestowing a kind of benediction. A quietly groundbreaking show.


Review: You Bury Me

An essential play so rich in its one-hour-forty you emerge dazed with possibilities. Director Katie Posner hopes it’ll change you. So do I.


Review: SAP

SAP will endure as both a superb play and key witness in a struggle for acceptance, to be heard. See it.


Review: Sugar Coat

Essential theatre. Five singer-actors, memorably punchy music, witty and heartbreaking – most of all groundbreaking – storytelling. 90 minutes of this and you’ll know just what to do with the patriarchy.


Review: Mad(e)

A mind-altering experience, and in writer and director one of the most inspiring partnerships I’ve seen


Review: Rocky Horror Show

The most lucid-voiced Rocky I’ve seen and on balance strongest cast for a long time. Two great reasons to return, or adventure for your first awakening on Planet Transexual.


Review: I, Joan

The title role goes to Isobel Thom, making their professional debut: the greatest I’ve ever seen.


Review: Delicious Fruit

A challenging piece of physical theatre based upon the views of the many queer voices heard by our two guides who asked all the questions.


Review: Fabulett 1933

Camp and tender musical portrayal of life for queers in 1933 Berlin through the forced closing of the decadent Fabulett club.