Review: We Are In Time

A heart jumping exploration of transplants with a majesty of the music at its heart and a subtle theatricality expanding it all


Review: Blood Brothers

The blend of definitive and new cast members in a recent classic has overwhelming impact: as story, as lyric fable, as terrible moral for these distracted times.


Review: What Girls Are Made Of

Cora Bissett’s set the bar thrillingly high for a new genre. Who could follow her?


Review: Oliver!

The songs and singers shine in this classic musical


Review: Frisky and Mannish: Poplab

An hour inside Frisky & Mannish’’s ‘Poplab’ is a complete crowd-pleasing riot. Feel-good vibes only!


Review: Rust

Exciting, innovative, and challenging


Review: Fiver

An enchanting speed-read of our connectedness, a reminder that a fiver can change your life. Irresistible.


Review: Pockets

For a great night out pick Pockets.


Review: My Left Right Foot The Musical

An Outrageous and Genius Explosion of What Inclusion Actually Means in the Arts Carried on the Heroic Chariot of Musical Theatre


Review: The Dark Carnival

An underground plot with other worldly twists and live turns in a carnival of music and stories that has massive over ground appeal


Review: Ghost

You’ll know the film. Despite the volume, you should know this.


Review: Hole

Wow drama, the original Greek tragoidia. It invokes the same powers, almost the same gods.


Review: Madagascar The Musical

Highly Recommended for monkeys and lemurs of all ages – quite apart from lions, zebras, hippos and giraffes.


Review: Dirty Dancing

There’s a fitting heart-warming climax to a dream of production. And a surprise to those who think they know the film.


Review: We’ve Got Each Other

The Bon Jovi Musical that has it all, except everything that is a tour de force, with lights, an incredible Sir Jon sound track and a narrator that brings it all together without the glitz and aplomb but all the flair.


Review: A Man’s A Man

Celebrate the life and death of the acclaimed poet Robert Burns, with marvelous music and daring prose


Review: Timpson The Musical

A pair of star-crossed lovers out to out-invent their foe, one Keypulet, the other Montashoe.


Review: A Gallant Life

An engaging and memorable performance, recounting motor-racing champion Muriel Thompson’s remarkable First World War experiences.


Review: Holy Moses

A charming retelling of the Moses story through two young people who may win the prize for show furthest travelled and certainly tell this tale with confidence.


Review: The Red Shoes

Sizzling reimagining of the Hans Christian Anderson tale in the context of Weimar Germany that brims full of artistic value


Review: Lift

An original musical with promise and vitality which nearly gets it spot on.


Review: Geek

A new comedy musical with an upbeat score, performed by an enthusiastic young cast.


Review: Summer Holiday

Stunning Ray Quinn and ensemble work their bobby-socks off with notable support from Rob Wicks and his band. Give No. 9 a proper MOT and it’ll strike gold too.


Review: Iolanthe

You’ll have to see this if you care for music theatre at all. it’s unmissable.


Review: Legally Blonde

You must see this. Apart from the heroic production itself, if there’s one outstanding performer it has to be Lucie Jones with Rita Simons’ superb support. Jones' voice is stunning, stratospheric, above all characterful.


Review: Crazy For You

This is a blast of the purest kind. You have to see it. In terms of talent on display worked to a supreme ensemble pitch, this is quite simply the most stunning pure musical I’ve seen this year.


Review: Into the Woods

This is an outstanding first-class revival, but more, it’s intimate knowing and innocent at the same time: it sports a residual wisdom beyond its brief.


Review: Blaas (Blow)

Tender, otherworldly, explorative and extraordinary, this is an exquisite show that is more than worth the trip out of town.


Review: Son of a Preacher Man

Son of a Preacher man has real potential. It’s easily more than a cut above a jukebox musical, and Revel-Horwood’s work particularly coupled with Herbert’s musical arrangements is exemplary. As is the marvellous and marvellously hard-working ensemble.


Review: Flashdance

It’s Joanne Clifton’s night. She lives Alex, dangerously pushing every routine with an extravagance, a hunger, sexiness and raw power that makes it one of the most memorable dance performances in a musical I’ve ever seen.


Review: Medea Electronica

Like the recent Suppliants, in a very different way, Medea Electronica asks just what we mean by Greek tragedy, what our conceptions of drama without music are. An essential experience.


Review: Grease

Grease really is the word


Review: The Suppliant Women

In one of the most radical productions ever mounted of Aeschylus indeed any Greek tragedy we’re literally taken to its roots: as in Greece, a community chorus of fifty, twenty-one of them the suppliant women of the play’s title. In this outstanding production, everything to resurrect this astonishing vision has been invoked.


Review: Saint George and the Dragon

This is an unsettling, unsettled play. Creating its own world, it asks something of substance no-one else is quite doing – not even Rory Mullarkey previously in The Wolf From the Door. His adaptation of the Oresteia for the Globe has after all come between. It’ll be intriguing to see where this big-boned, big-themed dramatist will venture next.


Review: Dreamboats and Petticoats

It’s back again. Laurence Marks and Maurice Gran’s nine-year dream Dreamboats and Petticoats returns to Theatre Royal, Brighton with a cast and creatives deserving high praise for creating the lightest touch out of slight narrative. Those who’ve seen it should start marvelling at the musicianship, and those who haven’t will increasingly join in.


Review: Follies

It took a visit into past and pastiche to propel Sondheim’s language into a modernity no-one foresaw. This is the finest realisation of this Janus-faced masterpiece, ringing with towering performances: Staunton, Bennett, Dee, Quast and Forbes simply at the head. This must be the definitive production.


Review: Fiddler on the Roof

Evans allows this musical theatre to breathe on his own big-hearted terms whilst allowing the bones to show, as it does with a breath-taking diminuendo that seems to raise and settle the dust of emigration as we watch. For sheer penetration, heart and balance it’s as definitive as we’re likely to see for many years.


Review: The Wedding Singer

This is an outstandingly-conceived show, generous to cast and audience alike, superbly choreographed and performed in what might seem challenging spaces. The last blast of summer’s breath: enjoy.


Review: Prom Kween

Come shimmy your sequined ball gown sister this is an hour of supercharged feel good musical fun -with a heart.


Review: SiX

Unmissable music from six of the best.


Review: La Cage aux Folles

La Cage aux Folles one might say comes home to Brighton’s Theatre Royal in this revival by Bill Kenwright Productions directed by Martin Connor. There’s no mystery why Brighton gets two weeks of this.


Review: Wall

An enthusiastic musical which promises to view the world from an alt left American perspective given current world posturing


Review: Committee

This edgy new development, faithful to one incident, marks a more than worthwhile variation on such larger works as London Road. It’s more illuminating than the history it sheds music on.


Review: All or Nothing

Carol Harrison’s written the band proud and plangent; her split hero strategies work to make this one of the best possible storylines of a British band, given hell-bent Marriott burning his talent at both ends, just like the decade.


Review: The Mikado

This Mikado not only redefines but rescues the operetta from an edgy oblivion, where we could never lose the melodies, yet increasingly hesitate to stage the work. It’s back.


Review: Turbulence

Musical Improv troupe keep improving.


Review: The Buddy Holly Story

The Buddy Holly Story is a superb show, the fast-track to know Buddy Holly’s world with storyline and songs that influenced and were influenced in turn. Alex Fobbester’s Buddy Holly inhabits his role with verve and heart-stopping sensitivity. There’s room to craft an even more compelling story, but as a show its generosity good-humoured inclusiveness proves irresistible.