Review: Mozzzi

Then it was DDT. Now it’s personal.


Review: Language Games

A quirky and delightful play of language and ideas in a short film depicting 4 characters in philosophical conversation (overseen by a giant, verbal rabbit).


Review: Two Horsemen

The glaring energy of this piece can’t disguise how it strikes profundity in its funny-bone.


Review: Living Newspaper #6

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch what this does with the future


Review: Metamorphosis

Compelling devised theatre - creative, dynamic and humourous!


Review: A Separate Peace

Stoppard looks at society’s phantom limb ethic. Even when it’s gone it aches, and it aches to have someone opting out.


Review: Far Away

Our greatest playwright since Beckett and Pinter. An outstanding revival. Hesitating?


Review: The Affair

A lovelorn lothario with ants in his pants meets his match in a knockabout clown play


Review: Moot Moot

Expect the unexpected...


Review: There She Is

A treat of an absurdist “tale” that brings the confusion of life into the centre of our universe


Review: Headhog

An absurdist comedy that suggests what is in your head may not be as simple as you think


Review: The Play That Goes Wrong

A play about amateurs no amateur company should even dare contemplate. There’s genius in the timing of all this. Outstanding.


Review: There She Is

An absurd tale of dance and conversations combined into a performance that settles into a treatise on barriers and perceptions.


Review: Another One

An impressive physical theatre piece that does seem to meander round a lack of connection.


Review: Monsieur Somebody

Excellent acting, intriguing new absurdist play by Seamus Collins is provocative and entertaining!


Review: Fandango

A joyfully bewildering, fascinating dose of punky, post-theatre


Review: Pity

Those receptive to those energies unleashed in the Ionesco, or more fitfully in Saint George and the Dragon will readily see Mullarkey’s almost unique position. What he writes next might define him.


Review: Exit the King

We need such risk-taking theatre back. This outstanding production of Exit the King might just remind us how to get it.


Review: Ubu Roi

An Absurd Look At The State We're In...And What Might Happen Next


Review: Pigspurt’s Daughter

Guardian obituary, 2008. ‘Ken Campbell was one of the most original and unclassifiable talents in British theatre of the past half-century.’ It just happens that his daughter Daisy is both that and far more. She’s one of the most cunning crafters of comedy and storytelling in the anti-business


Review: Ken

Terry Johnson’s two-hander might seem a low-key hommage but his script’s brilliant. It’s a re-affirmation of Campbell’s comic epic theatre, and inspires you to look out for what his daughter Daisy might be bringing to us at the Brighton Festival.


Review: Eurohouse

A modern European cautionary tale perforned by two engaging and clever clowns


Review: Phools

"a glorious beast of collective performance - comedy, music, drama and dialogue"


Review: Carabet

Wonderfully wacky sketch comedy with an absurdist twist.


Review: Borderline

"....saving you the need to go to Calais or any other refugee camp"


Review: Die Die Die Old People Die

A stunning new work from Ridiculusmus, the multi-award winning theatre company who specialise in transforming complex mental health issues into warm, witty and accessible performance.


Review: Great Train Robbery

Through an ingenious mix of clowning, physical theatre and wonderful singing, this comic four shed new light on ‘what really happened’ and ‘how they participated.’


Review: Blindfold: The Night of the Hunt

Four actors led by writer/director Sofia Stavrakaki enact what’s clearly a prison of a circus, people forced to perform a ritual of trouping for the delectation of a whip-cracking elite. A summary hardly does justice to the atmosphere this production evokes or the meta-language burning through the glares of hallucinated prey. You’ll know whether it’s for you if you like Beckett or European theatre


Review: Good People, Bad Day

I loved this piece and so, I think, did the audience on the first night. The cast’s comic timing is second to none. Go see it and be confounded by this fine troupe who deserved all the applause they received on the first night.


Review: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead

Daniel Radcliffe’s Rosencrantz is the box-office draw, all bemusement, beautifully drawn out in a hollow-cheeked slow horror of his lot. But it’s as Guildenstern that Joshua McGuire’s sashay from affront to despair through bemusement encompasses the open-mouth ‘lads’ Hamlet greets both with. And David Haig’s Player knowing he’s the opposite of a person insulates his reflective volatility from extinction. On the fiftieth anniversary of its Old Vic debut, Stoppard’s early masterpiece still startles in such a first-rate revival, protesting life to the black-out.


Review: The Comedy About a Bank Robbery

The Comedy About a Bank Robbery redefines the category, by edging beyond even recent work and revealing a classic structure entering a hall of mirrors and going mad. The musical as well as general ensemble is the most remarkably timed I’ve ever seen in a theatre, and the set designs and shifts the most frantically split into milliseconds. This is an outstanding and redefining farce in every way.


Review: Ubu Roi

Alfred Jarry's absurdist masterpiece gets a centenary outing.


Review: Blue Heart

A major Churchill season is long overdue, and her eightieth in 2018 shouldn’t be the only occasion of it. Orange Tree’s production is as good as it gets in Blue Heart.


Review: Stunning The Punters

Arguably, no single person in English theatre has a better understanding and presents a fuller expression of physical theatre than George Dillon. His vocal range is phenomenal whilst his physical presence is captivating. Superlatives become redundant.


Review: Wolf Meat

Profoundly silly and farcically serious show with just the kind of anarchy that offers coke to audience members. Contains brief and ghastly nudity.


Review: The Big Stiffy

Absurd and off-the-wall, this surreal funeral party is a bizarre experiment that really does pay off


Review: The Bald Prima Donna

Spirited pacey revival of Ionesco’s first play, with one stand-out performance and superbly idiomatic one. A perfect introduction to the playwright.


Review: A Dirty Get-Away!

Brilliantly silly and profound meditation on the nature of memory loss as innocence


Review: FEAST

A pinch of nudity, a splash of surrealism, and a dollop of the absurd. You won’t find anything else quite like it skimming through the Fringe brochure, that’s for sure.


Review: Hunger

Vampires bleeding the nation dry -visual, visceral, frightening and witty


Review: The Knee Jerk of Sloth

Moving and magical absurdist piece about homeless people


Review: Lady GoGo Goch

Wonderfully Welsh


Review: Heads Bodies Legs

Absurd, well made theatre with a lot of soul


Review: The Cow Play

Unique and powerful


Review: Pigmalion Zoo

An absurdist view of an apocalyptic time when a family have much to consider when structure has failed and the future is wholly uncertain


Review: Red Bastard

Red Bastard


Review: Mammoth

This is surreal guttural comedy, an absurdist play about everyday stuff…