Review: Rock, Paper, Scissors

A joyous revival. Though working in TV production, Hayden’s writing is too good, too well-shaped not to develop in theatre instead.


Review: Oh What a Lovely War

Musically directed by Ellie Verkerk the six-strong cast play instruments throughout. They’re a phenomenal team, singing beautifully a capella or in solo. With six young actors mostly fresh out of drama school absolutely at the top of their first game, we’re treated to acting both hungry to prove and yet touched by the world they’ve entered. This is an outstanding production.


Review: Mates in Chelsea

Mates in Chelsea is definitely worth seeing, and apart from adaptations surely the best thing this writer’s produced in a decade. Royal Court Theatre


Review: Dead Dad Dog

McKay is even-handed, and very funny. And don’t you just love a ghost in 1985 who’s never heard of Margaret Thatcher?


Review: Accidental Death of an Anarchist

The adage that farce is tragedy speeded up met its greatest progenitor in Dario Fo. In a ferocious new version by Tom Basden of Franca Rame’s and Fo’s Accidental Death of an Anarchist, directed by Daniel Raggett in a stunning production now at the Haymarket, the target here is squarely the London Met. And if you slowed down Basden’s brilliant, no-holds-unbludgeoned telling, details prove tragic enough.


Review: Purgatorio

Groundhog Day - Saying goodbye to old memories, whilst finding new ones. A beautiful physical representation on our ability to accept who we truly are! Get down to Club Purgatorio!


Review: AFTER ALL

Weinachter is an interchangeable chameleon: not just a dancer, but a rare performer who can do it all! Her style and execution of ideas paints a beautiful memory of her idiosyncratic talents in exploring the beginning and end of life. Stunningly poignant.


Review: The Ruffian on the Stair and Funeral Games

Joe Orton’s The Ruffian on the Stair and Funeral Games come to the Lantern Theatre for four performances. This in-house double bill of one-acters is directed by Daniel Finlay and Mark Burgess respectively. A fitting end to the Lantern’s extraordinary week


Review: FOOD

Geoff Sobelle’s performance is outstanding, absurd, magical and mysterious visual physical storytelling.


Review: Lie Low

A slick swirl of consent issues, insomnia and dancing to Benny Goodman


Review: BUTCHERED

The physicality of Ez Holland and Nic Lawton has to be seen to be believed.


Review: Can’t Pay? Won’t Pay!

A cost-of-living revolution in St James Street? You’d better believe it as Triada Theatre kick off the weekend with Dario Fo’s 1974 Can’t Pay? Won’t Pay! at the Lantern Theatre. Superb, energised theatre, rough occasionally, but mostly very-well performed, imaginatively staged, rapturously received. Now get out on the streets.


Review: Cheesy Cheesy Catchy Mousey

There’s surprises here you’ll discover. A superb landmark in Mark Daniels’ gifted exploration of Absurdism’s relevance. This isn’t deadly theatre, it’s quietly lethal to deathly assumptions everywhere. See it.


Review: all of it

Still the most sheerly thrilling yet intimate piece MacDowall has written, though all three pieces amplify that. A miniature classic of snatched meaning its staging too flashes by with shocking brevity. In all it lasts just 90 minutes. Catch it.


Review: A Caravan Named Desire

Anything by Alexander and Helen Millington is worth coming for. A Caravan Named Desire isn’t yet at the level of I Love Michael Ball but by the time you see it, it almost certainly will be. This is a team to watch and queue for.


Review: The Sewage

Two brothers, a lost goldfish, and a world of grotesque creatures ...


Review: LULU

Where's Lulu? Tricks and treats - A great combination of mime and acrobatics!


Review: Potato Topos

This is a creative original and unique meaningful experimental show.


Review: Beneath

A highly interesting absurdist environmental performance with an intense message given air from under the ocean


Review: Candide

"Brimming with ideas, full-blooded and full throated performance, Candide is presented successfully in a way only Babolin theatre can achieve."


Review: The Wrong Planet

There’s a great act struggling out of this blissfully baggy monster.


Review: Cocky and the Tardigrades

Bonkers brilliance. Cocky couldn’t have been premiered with two more stunning actors, and the author’s flawless stepping-in remains remarkable.


Review: The Play That Goes Wrong

A play about amateurs no amateur company should even dare contemplate. There’s genius in the timing of all this. Outstanding.


Review: Mozzzi

Then it was DDT. Now it’s personal.


Review: Language Games

A quirky and delightful play of language and ideas in a short film depicting 4 characters in philosophical conversation (overseen by a giant, verbal rabbit).


Review: Two Horsemen

The glaring energy of this piece can’t disguise how it strikes profundity in its funny-bone.


Review: Living Newspaper #6

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch what this does with the future


Review: Metamorphosis

Compelling devised theatre - creative, dynamic and humourous!


Review: A Separate Peace

Stoppard looks at society’s phantom limb ethic. Even when it’s gone it aches, and it aches to have someone opting out.


Review: Far Away

Our greatest playwright since Beckett and Pinter. An outstanding revival. Hesitating?


Review: The Affair

A lovelorn lothario with ants in his pants meets his match in a knockabout clown play


Review: Moot Moot

Expect the unexpected...


Review: There She Is

A treat of an absurdist “tale” that brings the confusion of life into the centre of our universe


Review: Headhog

An absurdist comedy that suggests what is in your head may not be as simple as you think


Review: The Play That Goes Wrong

A play about amateurs no amateur company should even dare contemplate. There’s genius in the timing of all this. Outstanding.


Review: There She Is

An absurd tale of dance and conversations combined into a performance that settles into a treatise on barriers and perceptions.


Review: Another One

An impressive physical theatre piece that does seem to meander round a lack of connection.


Review: Monsieur Somebody

Excellent acting, intriguing new absurdist play by Seamus Collins is provocative and entertaining!


Review: Fandango

A joyfully bewildering, fascinating dose of punky, post-theatre


Review: Pity

Those receptive to those energies unleashed in the Ionesco, or more fitfully in Saint George and the Dragon will readily see Mullarkey’s almost unique position. What he writes next might define him.


Review: Exit the King

We need such risk-taking theatre back. This outstanding production of Exit the King might just remind us how to get it.


Review: Ubu Roi

An Absurd Look At The State We're In...And What Might Happen Next


Review: Pigspurt’s Daughter

Guardian obituary, 2008. ‘Ken Campbell was one of the most original and unclassifiable talents in British theatre of the past half-century.’ It just happens that his daughter Daisy is both that and far more. She’s one of the most cunning crafters of comedy and storytelling in the anti-business


Review: Ken

Terry Johnson’s two-hander might seem a low-key hommage but his script’s brilliant. It’s a re-affirmation of Campbell’s comic epic theatre, and inspires you to look out for what his daughter Daisy might be bringing to us at the Brighton Festival.


Review: Eurohouse

A modern European cautionary tale perforned by two engaging and clever clowns


Review: Phools

"a glorious beast of collective performance - comedy, music, drama and dialogue"


Review: Carabet

Wonderfully wacky sketch comedy with an absurdist twist.


Review: Borderline

"....saving you the need to go to Calais or any other refugee camp"


Review: Die Die Die Old People Die

A stunning new work from Ridiculusmus, the multi-award winning theatre company who specialise in transforming complex mental health issues into warm, witty and accessible performance.


Review: Great Train Robbery

Through an ingenious mix of clowning, physical theatre and wonderful singing, this comic four shed new light on ‘what really happened’ and ‘how they participated.’


Review: Blindfold: The Night of the Hunt

Four actors led by writer/director Sofia Stavrakaki enact what’s clearly a prison of a circus, people forced to perform a ritual of trouping for the delectation of a whip-cracking elite. A summary hardly does justice to the atmosphere this production evokes or the meta-language burning through the glares of hallucinated prey. You’ll know whether it’s for you if you like Beckett or European theatre


Review: Good People, Bad Day

I loved this piece and so, I think, did the audience on the first night. The cast’s comic timing is second to none. Go see it and be confounded by this fine troupe who deserved all the applause they received on the first night.


Review: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead

Daniel Radcliffe’s Rosencrantz is the box-office draw, all bemusement, beautifully drawn out in a hollow-cheeked slow horror of his lot. But it’s as Guildenstern that Joshua McGuire’s sashay from affront to despair through bemusement encompasses the open-mouth ‘lads’ Hamlet greets both with. And David Haig’s Player knowing he’s the opposite of a person insulates his reflective volatility from extinction. On the fiftieth anniversary of its Old Vic debut, Stoppard’s early masterpiece still startles in such a first-rate revival, protesting life to the black-out.


Review: The Comedy About a Bank Robbery

The Comedy About a Bank Robbery redefines the category, by edging beyond even recent work and revealing a classic structure entering a hall of mirrors and going mad. The musical as well as general ensemble is the most remarkably timed I’ve ever seen in a theatre, and the set designs and shifts the most frantically split into milliseconds. This is an outstanding and redefining farce in every way.


Review: Ubu Roi

Alfred Jarry's absurdist masterpiece gets a centenary outing.


Review: Blue Heart

A major Churchill season is long overdue, and her eightieth in 2018 shouldn’t be the only occasion of it. Orange Tree’s production is as good as it gets in Blue Heart.


Review: Stunning The Punters

Arguably, no single person in English theatre has a better understanding and presents a fuller expression of physical theatre than George Dillon. His vocal range is phenomenal whilst his physical presence is captivating. Superlatives become redundant.


Review: Wolf Meat

Profoundly silly and farcically serious show with just the kind of anarchy that offers coke to audience members. Contains brief and ghastly nudity.


Review: The Big Stiffy

Absurd and off-the-wall, this surreal funeral party is a bizarre experiment that really does pay off