Review: Mozzzi

Then it was DDT. Now it’s personal.


Review: Dracula

You should see this with some fine acting and a storyline making more sense of Dracula than Stoker does himself.


Review: Last Easter

After all the uproar, it’s a quiet blinder.


Review: Staircase

A first-rate revival of a play that with its ostensible shock-value in aspic, reveals subversions and a clever structure so unsettling we should all look in the mirror and wince.


Review: Branching Out

Three very fine and one outstanding work, Scratches – the best kind of play on depression, self-harm, black holes. Because it’s screamingly funny and deeply connected to why we do theatre.


Review: Sitting Pretty

When you see this show return, it’ll be outstanding, and in the frame for awards.


Review: Eng-er-Land

Writer/performer Hannah Kumari leaves you alert and exhilarated


Review: After All These Years

A superb play, it should as one director present said, be in the West End. With these actors.


Review: Push and Pull

A quietly thrilling evening, after it goes off with a bang and a bear.


Review: The Lady in the Van

Sarah Mann and her company will surely return with this gem of transubstantiation.


Review: Living Newspaper #6

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch what this does with the future


Review: Metamorphosis

Compelling devised theatre - creative, dynamic and humourous!


Review: Henry IV Part 2

An alert, dark-hued production. We have heard the chimes at midnight


Review: The New Tomorrow

There’s a generosity here, a big hug. Theatre itself affirms the value of life to those who might yet shape it for the better.


Review: The Two Noble Kinsmen

We’re looking at a bright Book of Hours. Barrie Rutter’s done it profound service, adding a warmth and agency that opens up this pageant. This is hopefully just the first of many such he’ll bring to the Globe.


Review: A Kind of People

Bhatti nails truth to the doors of injustice. It’s well we heeded it.


Review: The Lady Vanishes

A first-class production. Crisply paced, beautifully detailed, this ensemble is flawless, the finest Bill Kenwright’s team have produced


Review: Sam Morrison: Hello, Daddy!

Accomplished and fruity comedy from a young gay comedian who’s already mastered stand up.


Review: Beep Boop

A one man mime and physical comedy theatre show with a live digital soundscape, exploring society’s uneasy obsession with online life and the curious delusional pull away from an actually lonely reality.


Review: Blackboxing

A hilarious solo show parody with a surprising amount of heart.


Review: Gone Edinburgh

Scottish folk music peppered with social justice themes and mischievous grins


Review: The Birth of Death

“A profoundly moving and disarmingly funny journey, looking at death and how we approach it…”


Review: History Of Ireland

“A slick combination of politically driven theatre, dance and comedy with more than a touch of the Blarney…”


Review: Grimm’s Tales

An exuberant Christmas production, and a miracle of compression, blocking, set-design and ensemble acting skills.


Review: Fame

Excellent feelgood musical though there’s superabundant dance content.


Review: Rain Man

An absorbing, subtly mind-altering night out.


Review: Square Rounds

Proud Haddock have delivered their own stamp on Harrison’s verse-play, and it’s mostly thrilling


Review: Dust

This is outstanding. See it.


Review: Square Go

Masculinity and absurdity with a swagger and a cheek tae talk so it is, thrown in wi yer ma and yer brother as we see a hilarious fight for the right tae … hide.


Review: Erewhon

A fascinating adaptation of a novel of its time, presented in a concept of its time but in a timeless fashion for a modern audience.


Review: Paradiso

Superior puppetry skills in a Carry On Care Home scenario


Review: An Abundance of Tims

The one white male solo comedy show you absolutely should see this Fringe.


Review: Honey’s Happening

Welcome to Honey's Happening where pineapple surprise and party games are sure to bring about world peace


Review: A Joke

A joyful leap into the unknown. These incredible performers take you on masterclass of japery.


Review: Casting Off

Three generations of women 'Cast Off' all stereotypes of what they can, should and be able to do.


Review: Pity

Those receptive to those energies unleashed in the Ionesco, or more fitfully in Saint George and the Dragon will readily see Mullarkey’s almost unique position. What he writes next might define him.


Review: Exit the King

We need such risk-taking theatre back. This outstanding production of Exit the King might just remind us how to get it.


Review: Flesh and Bone

Warren’s East London heritage is similar to other writers, and it’s his time to re-tell it now, with new notes and a love of language that muscles in and won’t let go.


Review: Bon Ami

A new comedy show about friendship, digital media, social isolation and loneliness.


Review: Gun

One-man homage to classic westerns delivered at a break-neck speed.


Review: Ubu Roi

An Absurd Look At The State We're In...And What Might Happen Next


Review: White Girls

Clever but raw self-referential storytelling that will likely divide audiences


Review: Arr We There Yet?

A Madcap Mashup of Circus and Storytelling with a Little Tango for Extra Spice


Review: A Brave Face

This is a piece for everyone over 10 and should be seen at all costs.


Review: One Woman Alien

I can predict that by the end of its run, this should be the most outstanding one-person show you’ll see in the last week.


Review: Pigspurt’s Daughter

Guardian obituary, 2008. ‘Ken Campbell was one of the most original and unclassifiable talents in British theatre of the past half-century.’ It just happens that his daughter Daisy is both that and far more. She’s one of the most cunning crafters of comedy and storytelling in the anti-business


Review: The Looker

A show about freedom. Funny, subversive, deeply philosophical - and beautiful.


Review: The Prudes

Neilson’s piece twists an unexpected root out of recent debates over power and sexual abuse the Royal Court has addressed so consistently. Uniquely Neilson’s made the faintly horrible full-on hilarious.