Review: Metamorphoses

The overriding sense, not surprisingly with these actors, is joy.


Review: A Splinter of Ice

Absorbing. With such an acting masterclass the play’s a bewitchingly-voiced fugue on the limits of belief and betrayal.


Review: The Normal Heart

An outstanding revival. If you see one play this autumn, make it this one.


Review: Rice

Do see this work of understated virtuosity, rich in character, substance, a shape-shifting singularity.


Review: Looking Good Dead

A first-rate production. If you enjoy thrillers, you must see this.


Review: The Chalk Garden

Not quite the last drawing-room comedy. But the Janus-faced prophesy of plays that took thirty years to catch up.


Review: Is God Is

A stunning, preternaturally timed production


Review: What If If Only

Churchill’s anatomy of grief is what abides. Its emotional plangency and pulling the future open is unique.


Review: Leopoldstat

Stoppard’s written out his theatrical testament. Outstanding.


Review: The Dresser

If you’ve not seen The Dresser, you shouldn’t pass up this production.


Review: Steam

There’s a grain in this play promising the transcendent.


Review: Walden

Amy Berryman’s Walden is a remarkable play where the earth itself’s at the cross-planet, and travellers in space have inner and outer choices.


Review: Julius Caesar

A fleet powerful Julius Caesar, with some outstanding performances


Review: Twelfth Night

With Michelle Terry as Viola, one of the most touching and truthful Twelfth Nights I’ve seen.


Review: Romeo and Juliet

A fleet, brilliantly upending, wholly relevant take on the Verona-ready toxicity feeding male violence and young depression


Review: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Outdoors, this has grown prodigously. Some actors give transcendent performances up there with London’s finest. Out in the slant air this proves magical.


Review: Hear, Speak, See

A brilliantly dramatic examination of women’s power plays at a dinner party like no other.


Review: Wrong Number

An entertaining take on how lock down may have led to potential lawlessness.


Review: Slings and Arrows

The principal reason why a stage should always be a platform for the voices unheard.


A fascinatingly delivered riff on one woman’s journey for recognition and soul which includes a brush from a smear test.


Review: Shook

An exceptional performance of an exceptional play


Review: This Beautiful Future

Heartstopping. There’s an absoluteness here we need. We must prove desperate for it or die ourselves.


Review: For All the Love You Lost

A fascinating portrait of the anxiety of youth, the loss of somebody close and that endings are not always assured, even in a theatre.


Review: Paradise

A sleeping classic in the making


Review: Madhouse

A fascinating drama around students stuck in one house that is, indeed, a bit mad.


Review: Rosetti’s Women

A lovely, dramatic presentation that covers the racy relationships, from the perspectives of three of his women, of Dante Gabriel Rossetti.


Review: Richard II

One of OFS’s strongest productions, it’s also a return to roots.


Review: Femme Ta Bouche

A melodramatic revelation and epic journey of self-discovery that is prescient and worthy of a pedestal upon which to put itself.


Review: Plasters

Two actors in a relationship, both on and offstage, struggle to find meaning for themselves.


Review: Myra’s Story

One woman, many characters, several tragedies told with the earnestness of truth and the triumph of theatre.


Review: Miss Julie

The end is like life-blood draining away. It’s what Strindberg meant. See it.


Review: Dracula

You should see this with some fine acting and a storyline making more sense of Dracula than Stoker does himself.


Review: The Mother Load

Three women, three pregnancies, three experiences, much laughter and revelation in a funny and engaging audio performance.


Review: Hindu Times

A religious text for our times, told in the language of the now with universal messages.


Review: Braw Tales

An innovative and bright response to the pandemic in cartoon and monologue that is as diverse as great to watch.


Review: Last Easter

After all the uproar, it’s a quiet blinder.


Review: and breathe…

Yomi Sode’s hybrid theatre is a compelling immersion of witness and poetry: we need more of it.


Review: Staircase

A first-rate revival of a play that with its ostensible shock-value in aspic, reveals subversions and a clever structure so unsettling we should all look in the mirror and wince.


Review: The Macbeths

A scintillating film of claustrophobic terror in the company of the most infamous fictional duo on the stage.


Review: Branching Out

Three very fine and one outstanding work, Scratches – the best kind of play on depression, self-harm, black holes. Because it’s screamingly funny and deeply connected to why we do theatre.


Review: You

‘YOU’ is about loss and the way it has shaped Kathleen's life.


Review: Eng-er-Land

Writer/performer Hannah Kumari leaves you alert and exhilarated


Review: Lone Flyer

An absorbing drama, absorbingly acted and produced.


Review: After All These Years

A superb play, it should as one director present said, be in the West End. With these actors.


Review: Between Two Waves

A play about the Climate Crisis, family, photography and being screwed by insurance.


Review: The Vertical Hour

The definitive Fringe revival of a mainstream play this year. Absorbing, baggy, intimate. See it.


Review: Push and Pull

A quietly thrilling evening, after it goes off with a bang and a bear.


Review: The Lady in the Van

Sarah Mann and her company will surely return with this gem of transubstantiation.


Review: Shaw Shorts

A joyous, heady and oh-so-welcome return to this intimate yet high-kicking theatre. An absolute must-see.


Review: Two Horsemen

The glaring energy of this piece can’t disguise how it strikes profundity in its funny-bone.


Review: Hole

Don’t miss the chance to see this transcendent actor prove she possesses another dimension altogether.


Review: Tennis Elbow

An audio treat from a master of toying with your senses.


Review: Sacrament

A revelation, superbly written and acted. Comparisons have been made with A Girl Is A Half-formed Thing. I can think of no higher praise either. You must see this.


Review: Living Newspaper #7

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch a group of young dramatists take on the future


Review: Illusions of Liberty

A finely-calibrated solo play of what it’s like to enter that tunnel of near-undiagnosable but very real illness. Corinne Walker’s both authoritative and quicksilver. Do catch it.


Review: Vespertilio

Vespertilio marks Barry McStay’s emergence as a writer of distinction. Anything he writes now should be looked out for.


Review: Living Newspaper #6

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch what this does with the future


Review: Living Newspaper #5

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch.


Review: Outside

As with Inside, Outside not only fits us, they help us to move on, and become in their modest, unassuming and utterly transcendent way, part of how we learn to.


Review: Icarus

After all the gods and their lack of choice, we come to the final instalment, the human dimension. Where we have one. A heartfelt, satisfying finish.


Review: Aphrodite

Dazzling: wise, clever twists about choice, male determination, and consequence.


Review: Pygmalion

The most profound reinvention of this particular myth I’ve seen


Review: Orpheus

A terrific reinvention, bringing gods and heroines up from the death of myth to an altered world.


Review: Persephone

Dazzling: wise, clever twists about choice, male determination, and consequence.


Review: Angela

A tender, beautifully pitched exploration of the individuality of a life, despite what illness may eventually steal.


Review: Scaramouche Jones

Shane Ritchie’s phenomenal energy and slidings in and out of tongues, mesmerises.


Review: Inside

They’re live. And Orange Tree. Catch them.


Review: Scammed

A two handed exploration on the fear that comes from unknown calling.


Review: Adventurous

A play gently subverting all expectations. Feeling Adventurous? You should.


Review: Typical

How British society stereotypes Black masculinity.