Review: Sanctuary

Christine Rose as dramatist is a name we’ll be hearing, with luck, very soon.


Review: Banging Denmark

This production’s 100 minutes are so absorbing you’re not quite sure if the time’s stopped, or just your preconceptions. Stunning, a must see.


Review: The Human Body

The work’s best at its quietest, where intimacy doesn’t need shouting. It’s still an intriguing development, as Kirkwood, as in her magnificent The Welkin, interrogates the condescensions of history.


Review: London Zoo

A masterly play in the making. It goes where very few dare, and in an environment we think we know. Very highly recommended.


Review: Cowbois

Cranford’s gone Wild West, via the Court and RSC. Cowbois is of course daft. But it’s magnificent in its silliness, contains wonderful – and truthful – moments. Deadly serious can have you rolling in the aisles and still jump up for the revolution.


Review: The Good John Proctor

A valuable corrective to anticipate both real events and Arthur Miller’s take on Abigail Williams


Review: The House of Bernarda Alba

Adaptor Alice Birch takes the House apart like Rachel Whiteread’s sculpture. Harriet Walter is magnificent: staring out like a jailor, patrolling. Hainsworth remains hypnotic and terrible, joyously sexual and headlong as her Juliet in self-destruction.


Review: The Good Dad (A Love Story), The Mitfords

Now a superb double-bill, and makes a compelling case for these two shows to be yoked together, with their intertwining of family, sisterhood, abuse and terrible consequences.


Review: The Confessions

Though not the ordinary made phenomenal, Alexander Zeldin’s touchstone, it’s an outstanding personally-inflected testament and striking advance.


Review: The Yellow Wallpaper

Stephanie Mohr’s adaptation is a remarkable manifestation (no other word seems more apt) of the Charlotte Perkins Gilman short story The Yellow Wallpaper, an important realisation of a key feminist awakening. It’s good enough for you not to want it depicted in any other way.


Review: Black Mountain, I Dream Before I Take the Stand

In Black Mountain Brad Birch shows in part how fine he can be. Arlene Hutton’s I Dream Before I Take the Stand is a short assault on the way the law assaults its victims, particularly women.


Review: Fergus O’Donnell, Losing the Plot, Rebecca Frew Safe, Bernadette Cremin Painless

Erin Burbridge kept tech sound and lighting effectively sashaying throughout, and tre propsl, particularly in the latter piece, attractive and undistracting. In just three months work, with term-breaks, this course run and directed by Burgess tonight has produced something vital. It needs celebrating and its best work a swift life in full-scale productions.


Review: Makeshifts, Realities, Honour Thy Father

Finborough’s absorbing ReDiscovered season continues with a triple-bill of plays directed by Melissa Dunne that after tonight, you might never wish to imagine apart. Of course they should transfer, be far better-known, and at least they’re packed out - grab a ticket if you possibly can. We can be grateful again for Neil McPherson’s curating yet another series of early 20th century revivals.


Review: Did You Eat?

The combined talents of Kim and Yejin are a force to be reckoned with, and it is hard not to feel while watching that we are seeing the beginnings of a potentially legendary partnership.


Review: Initial Consult

Despite what might seem to be heavy material, there is never a moment where you feel like you can’t laugh. It is all delivered with warmth, energy, and skill that is impossible to not be charmed by. 


Review: Under the Kunde Tree

There’s much to learn here, and as theatrical spectacle this is the intimate intimating the epic. Clarisse Makundul has given us a powerful work, and I’d urge you to see it.


Review: Bloody Medea!!!

Physical comedy debut by April Small; with a bit part for Zeus, puppet-deaths and an elephant themed singsong.


Review: Lovefool

Though it might be red-topped as a Fleabag for the abused, it’s so much more excoriating. It’s also a work profoundly moving, necessary and – particularly for Gintare Parulyte - an act of courage. Lovefool’s on till May 26th; do rush to this 55-minute must-see.


Review: Havisham

As ever with Heather Alexander, this is a masterclass in acting. It’s also a masterclass in directing and technical address. The outstanding one-person show of the Fringe so far


Review: Manic

A new solo show that combines puppetry, spoken word and theatre to bring an honest look at sex and trauma to Brighton Fringe 2023


Review: Strike!

An important work, not just for historical reasons; you’ll leave cheering.


Review: Sugar Coat

Essential theatre. Five singer-actors, memorably punchy music, witty and heartbreaking – most of all groundbreaking – storytelling. 90 minutes of this and you’ll know just what to do with the patriarchy.


Review: Love All

Another first-rank revival from JST, specialists in rediscoveries: a fitting end to Tom Littler’s tenure.


Review: I, Joan

The title role goes to Isobel Thom, making their professional debut: the greatest I’ve ever seen.


Review: Ghislaine/Gabler

A spell binding multi layered exploration of privilege, entitlement, and the desire to control…


Review: Astra

There’s nothing remotely like it and Foyle’s team have broken through to the stars.


Review: House of Shades

There’ll be nothing more blazing or relevant on the London stage this year.


Review: Consent

Raine balances articulate ferocity with its opposite: a broken plea. Scott Roberts’ revival improves on the NT premiere. In his hands Consent’s a small classic.


Review: Henry VIII

A wonderful score and musicians, above all Bea Segura’s titanic act of shrivelling, make this a must-see.


Review: Airswimming

Superb revival of Charlotte Jones’s play about two women incarcerated for fifty years for bring different. With a standing ovation of such force that convention had to be broken with the actors forced back on stage.


Review: Marys Seacole

No simple swapping of heirs and originals, but a dream of the future by Seacole, or equally present dreams raking the past. Do see this.


Review: Room

As a condensation and enactment of Woolf’s seminal text this can’t be improved on. The outstanding one-person show I’ve seen this Fringe.


Review: Little Wimmin

An adaptation of Louisa May Alcott's classic novel Little Women by all-female performance art collective Figs in Wigs


Review: The Chalk Garden

Not quite the last drawing-room comedy. But the Janus-faced prophesy of plays that took thirty years to catch up.


Review: Six

Outstanding, the finest West End musical for years


Review: Sitting Pretty

When you see this show return, it’ll be outstanding, and in the frame for awards.


Review: Sacrament

A revelation, superbly written and acted. Comparisons have been made with A Girl Is A Half-formed Thing. I can think of no higher praise either. You must see this.


Review: Living Newspaper #7

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch a group of young dramatists take on the future


Review: Living Newspaper #6

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch what this does with the future


Review: Inside This Box

Showcases future names and above all is defiant with hope and agency


Review: Rebel Boob

What happens when your life as you know it stops, and then starts again.


Review: Jane Eyre

You’ll never see a better adaptation of this classic


Review: Shoe Lady

Katherine Parkinson inhabits that breaking through the office crust asphyxiating us


Review: Nora

Stef Smith’s brilliant riff on Ibsen’s original is revelatory


Review: Scenes with girls

Scenes with girls owns a buzz, a life, a difference about loving that gives it a sliver of unique.


Review: Swive

A Hilliard rather than Holbein, it’s the velocity of Elizabeth’s survival that enthrals


Review: Parakeet

A new play about finding your flock in a world that doesn't seem to care


Review: Butterflies

Taut and funny new writing from this queer led theatre company


Review: Taboo

A chilling glimpse into the world of a little known but influential woman from the Nazi era.


Review: Sullied

“A brave, empowering and explosive blend of dance and spoken word…”


Review: J’n’R

A witty exploration of contemporary dating culture with a Shakespearean twist


Review: White Pearl

The finest new play from the Court this year, gleaming and deadly


Review: Sary

The imaginative force, language and unsettled serenity of this work demands a sustained run.


Review: Freak

A play everyone should see – and a first-rate revival.


Review: History Of Ireland

“A slick combination of politically driven theatre, dance and comedy with more than a touch of the Blarney…”


Review: Tiptree

Written and performed by Jenny Rowe


Review: Top Girls

It doesn’t get much better than this.


Review: Dressed

Intrigue through choreography, voice, music and an episodic structure which appears odd and piecemeal but is drawn together in a theatrically explosive fashion


Review: Inside Bitch

Visceral and sometimes very very funny. Then not. Essential viewing.