Review: Music For Rooftops

On the roof, balcony and terrace, a brass extravaganza


Review: Twelfth Night

With Michelle Terry as Viola, one of the most touching and truthful Twelfth Nights I’ve seen.


Review: Romeo and Juliet

A fleet, brilliantly upending, wholly relevant take on the Verona-ready toxicity feeding male violence and young depression


Review: Dirty Dancing

There’s a fitting heart-warming climax to a dream of production. And a surprise to those who think they know the film.


Review: The Tempest

Café Voltaire in ruffs invokes a magical Tempest.


Review: RAT

Sophisticated music and artistic shadow puppetry!


Review: Paradise

A sleeping classic in the making


Review: The Dream Train

Contemplative and beautiful to watch, 4 characters interact in juxtaposed realities underscored by Bach's Goldberg Variations


Review: Celebrating Okoe

A beautiful homage to a personal friend and teacher that is rich and deep in the rhythm of celebration.


Review: Richard II

One of OFS’s strongest productions, it’s also a return to roots.


Review: The Twits

A summer must-see to charge you up for the autumn, and taking on the real twits ahead.


Review: Six

Outstanding, the finest West End musical for years


Review: Dracula

You should see this with some fine acting and a storyline making more sense of Dracula than Stoker does himself.


Review: Tom Lehrer

Another sovereign tribute. Stefan Bednarczyk brings Tom Lehrer swaggering out of retirement.  


Review: Last Easter

After all the uproar, it’s a quiet blinder.


Review: and breathe…

Yomi Sode’s hybrid theatre is a compelling immersion of witness and poetry: we need more of it.


Review: More Grimm Tales

A rollicking production with razored timing, musical cues and ad-libs worked in to half-second slots. A must-see.


Review: Branching Out

Three very fine and one outstanding work, Scratches – the best kind of play on depression, self-harm, black holes. Because it’s screamingly funny and deeply connected to why we do theatre.


Review: Dazzling Divas

Issy Van Randwyck brings seven divas to life in this paean to tragic fulfilment.


Review: Living Newspaper #6

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch what this does with the future


Review: Hymn

Its potency lies in a fine peeling apart by Adrian Lester and Danny Sapini, and the language that bridges it.


Review: The New Tomorrow

There’s a generosity here, a big hug. Theatre itself affirms the value of life to those who might yet shape it for the better.


Review: Troilus and Cressida

We’re privileged to see this rarely-performed work moulded by OFS. A play for our times.


Review: As You Like It

Heartwarming, giddyingly vital yet clear with its own truth.


Review: Amadeus

In the most spectacular production imaginable, Lucian Msamati’s supremely crafted lead sets off the quicksilver of his rival Adam Gillen.


Review: Les Blancs

A superb realization of Lorraine Hansberry's unfinished masterpiece - a classic of Ibsenite proportions


Review: Small Island

A reboot for the future, a passport for change.


Review: Coriolanus

A Coriolanus memorable for politics sinewed with personal forces: an active interrogation of democracy. And in Josie Rourke’s production Tom Hiddleston’s someone riven by intimations of his true self


Review: This House

Vibrant proof as to why it’s been called the play of the decade


Review: The Sound of Music

Phenomenal singing all round. A more than solid recommendation for that alone.


Review: The Two Noble Kinsmen

We’re looking at a bright Book of Hours. Barrie Rutter’s done it profound service, adding a warmth and agency that opens up this pageant. This is hopefully just the first of many such he’ll bring to the Globe.


Review: Barber Shop Chronicles

Barber Shop Chronicles is a breath-taking revelation for those of us who had small inkling of a world in miniature.


Review: By Jeeves!

A thoroughly enjoyable period-style musical.


Review: Antony and Cleopatra

Supremely worth it to see a pair so famous weighing equal in their own balance, perhaps for the first time.


Review: Romeo and Juliet

Completeness is just one reason to cherish this clean-driven clear-headed production


Review: Love Never Dies

One of the most fascinating dark-hued musicals Lloyd-Webber’s written


Review: Twelfth Night

Tamsin Greig’s extremes as Malvolia mark the first intimations of the terrible and define this production. The ground’s shifted.


Review: The Winter’s Tale

Far more than a curate’s egg, this production reveals things we’ve never seen


Review: The Phantom of the Opera

The Albert Hall’s sovereign production, unlikely to be surpassed particularly with the special encore.


Review: Treasure Island

First-rate theatre. In Joshua James’ Ben Gunn and above all Pasy Ferran’s Jim, we see stars rising quicker than Arthur Darvill’s superb Silver can point them out.


Review: Wonderland

Outstanding. Surely the definitive study of the dignity of physical labour, and breaking of its amity.


Review: Jane Eyre

You’ll never see a better adaptation of this classic


Review: Women Beware Women

A stylish, timely production which redefines how we experience Middleton.


Review: Quartet

Like The French Lieutenant’s Woman, there are now two endings to Quartet. You must see this if you know the film only, or care about music, ageing, friendship and achingly lost love.


Review: Lance Mok Piano Recital

Confirms Mok confirms he’s a pianist bristling with oblique lyricism and spiky character – an ideal late 19th century-20th century interpreter.


Review: The Visit

Kushner’s just brought The Visit home with him.


Review: The Taming of the Shrew

See it and you’ll never think of the Shrew without this groundbreaking stab at the dreams of men.


Review: Blood Brothers

The blend of definitive and new cast members in a recent classic has overwhelming impact: as story, as lyric fable, as terrible moral for these distracted times.


Review: You Stupid Darkness!

Bleakly funny, with flickers of tragedy, to make you see how redemptive kindness is


Review: The Welkin

Already a contender for one of the best plays of 2020.


Review: Roots

An Edinburgh International Festival, HOME Manchester, Spoleto Festival USA & Theatre de la Ville Paris co-production


Review: Henry VI

The most effective condensation of the pith of the trilogy we’re likely to see.


Review: Three Sisters

This spectacular production beats with a fervour and purpose few adaptations achieve. Ellams has made Three Sisters new.


Review: Swive

A Hilliard rather than Holbein, it’s the velocity of Elizabeth’s survival that enthrals


Review: Great Expectations

A professionally-realized NVT production, consummate and brooding


Review: A Christmas Carol

The most original, potent and uplifting Christmas Carol I’ve ever seen


Review: Sussex Musicians Concert

Singers set a few benchmarks and piansit Kevin Allen in particular ferociously adventuring to fresh sonorities


Review: As You Like It

For Lucy Phelps and Sophie Khan Levy above all, this is a joyful As You Like It.