Review: A Splinter of Ice

Absorbing. With such an acting masterclass the play’s a bewitchingly-voiced fugue on the limits of belief and betrayal.


Review: The Normal Heart

An outstanding revival. If you see one play this autumn, make it this one.


Review: Rice

Do see this work of understated virtuosity, rich in character, substance, a shape-shifting singularity.


Review: Looking Good Dead

A first-rate production. If you enjoy thrillers, you must see this.


Review: The Chalk Garden

Not quite the last drawing-room comedy. But the Janus-faced prophesy of plays that took thirty years to catch up.


Review: Relatively Speaking

With his new production director Robin Herford, most associated with this play, brings pace, panache, and more than a dose of Ayckbourn’s generosity of spirit


Review: Is God Is

A stunning, preternaturally timed production


Review: What If If Only

Churchill’s anatomy of grief is what abides. Its emotional plangency and pulling the future open is unique.


Review: Leopoldstat

Stoppard’s written out his theatrical testament. Outstanding.


Review: The Dresser

If you’ve not seen The Dresser, you shouldn’t pass up this production.


Review: Steam

There’s a grain in this play promising the transcendent.


Review: Mozzzi

Then it was DDT. Now it’s personal.


Review: The Midnight Bell

An outstanding ballet by any standards. One that like its inspiration Patrick Hamilton will last.


Review: Walden

Amy Berryman’s Walden is a remarkable play where the earth itself’s at the cross-planet, and travellers in space have inner and outer choices.


Review: Julius Caesar

A fleet powerful Julius Caesar, with some outstanding performances


Review: Twelfth Night

With Michelle Terry as Viola, one of the most touching and truthful Twelfth Nights I’ve seen.


Review: Romeo and Juliet

A fleet, brilliantly upending, wholly relevant take on the Verona-ready toxicity feeding male violence and young depression


Review: Dirty Dancing

There’s a fitting heart-warming climax to a dream of production. And a surprise to those who think they know the film.


Review: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Outdoors, this has grown prodigously. Some actors give transcendent performances up there with London’s finest. Out in the slant air this proves magical.


Review: The Tempest

Café Voltaire in ruffs invokes a magical Tempest.


Review: Prison Game

Hercules is a very compelling performer who has created a snapshot of a microcosm that we can learn from, in this complex meaningful physical theatre show


Review: Shook

An exceptional performance of an exceptional play


Review: RAT

Sophisticated music and artistic shadow puppetry!


Review: Looking for América

Epic personal story, very well crafted and performed. It’s a lifetime and back – a meaningful, visceral and emotive experience. Not to be missed!


Review: The Man Who Planted Trees

A must-see performance of a moving and timely story told by two men and a dog- an inventive treat for adults as well as kids


Review: Distance Remaining

A quirky film, beautifully acted about three separate lives.


Review: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Some actors give transcendent performances up there with London’s finest. Out in the slant air this will now prove magical.


Review: This Beautiful Future

Heartstopping. There’s an absoluteness here we need. We must prove desperate for it or die ourselves.


Review: For All the Love You Lost

A fascinating portrait of the anxiety of youth, the loss of somebody close and that endings are not always assured, even in a theatre.


Review: Paradise

A sleeping classic in the making


Review: Madhouse

A fascinating drama around students stuck in one house that is, indeed, a bit mad.


Review: Rosetti’s Women

A lovely, dramatic presentation that covers the racy relationships, from the perspectives of three of his women, of Dante Gabriel Rossetti.


Review: Rapunzel

A tremendously enthusiastic summer panto slap bang in the tradition of getting them going, taking them on a journey and filling them full of good cheer.


Review: The Dream Train

Contemplative and beautiful to watch, 4 characters interact in juxtaposed realities underscored by Bach's Goldberg Variations


Review: Richard II

One of OFS’s strongest productions, it’s also a return to roots.


Review: Femme Ta Bouche

A melodramatic revelation and epic journey of self-discovery that is prescient and worthy of a pedestal upon which to put itself.


Review: Plasters

Two actors in a relationship, both on and offstage, struggle to find meaning for themselves.


Review: Myra’s Story

One woman, many characters, several tragedies told with the earnestness of truth and the triumph of theatre.


Review: The Twits

A summer must-see to charge you up for the autumn, and taking on the real twits ahead.


Review: The Power of Silence

Memories, imagery, tender and searing recollections - it creeps up on you!


Review: Misfits

An important play, tackling the deadly serious with laughter that all too easily could lead to stark tragedy.


Review: Six

Outstanding, the finest West End musical for years


Review: The Odyssey

As spellbinding as Circe and Calypso in one


Review: Sweet William

Naturally enriched by living with Shakespeare Michael Pennington unearths local habitations and names for him.


Review: Troy Story

Again the most educative stand-up and a thrilling presentation. Oh and bloody funny on war, male sexuality and the Bechdel Test.


Review: Miss Julie

The end is like life-blood draining away. It’s what Strindberg meant. See it.


Review: Dracula

You should see this with some fine acting and a storyline making more sense of Dracula than Stoker does himself.


Review: Saviour

A remarkable one-person play, performed to literal fever pitch by its creator.


Review: Tom Lehrer

Another sovereign tribute. Stefan Bednarczyk brings Tom Lehrer swaggering out of retirement.  


Review: Mr and Mrs Nobody

A warm-hearted yet sharp-witted peek at how the Pooter half live


Review: On Arriving

On Arriving takes sixty minutes it seems we’ve been immersed in a Greek Tragedy of ninety. See it.


Review: The Mother Load

Three women, three pregnancies, three experiences, much laughter and revelation in a funny and engaging audio performance.


Review: Hindu Times

A religious text for our times, told in the language of the now with universal messages.


Review: Last Easter

After all the uproar, it’s a quiet blinder.


Review: and breathe…

Yomi Sode’s hybrid theatre is a compelling immersion of witness and poetry: we need more of it.


Review: Staircase

A first-rate revival of a play that with its ostensible shock-value in aspic, reveals subversions and a clever structure so unsettling we should all look in the mirror and wince.


Review: More Grimm Tales

A rollicking production with razored timing, musical cues and ad-libs worked in to half-second slots. A must-see.


Review: Rebel Boob

Based on interviews with women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer.