Review: Tom Lehrer

Another sovereign tribute. Stefan Bednarczyk brings Tom Lehrer swaggering out of retirement.  


Review: Dazzling Divas

Issy Van Randwyck brings seven divas to life in this paean to tragic fulfilment.


Review: Anton Chekhov

The nearest we’ll come to meeting Chekhov. In Pennington’s masterclass.


Review: Afterplay

Miraculously-attuned. A wafer-thin but absolutely genuine slice of Chekhov. Do see it.


Review: Sunshine Boy

A fascinating homage to the world of a true maverick and genius from one of Scotland’s own.


Review: This Is Elvis

Inevitably this stands or falls by Steve Michaels, but it could only be outstanding if the whole production revs around it, and this one fires into life, never letting up. This Is Elvis. Elvis lives. End of.


Review: If I Catch Alphonso, Tonight!

Jenner’s moved out of the comfort zone of his Coward years which suit him particularly, or straight acting. It’s a remarkable feat.


Review: Son of a Preacher Man

Son of a Preacher man has real potential. It’s easily more than a cut above a jukebox musical, and Revel-Horwood’s work particularly coupled with Herbert’s musical arrangements is exemplary. As is the marvellous and marvellously hard-working ensemble.


Review: Dreamboats and Petticoats

It’s back again. Laurence Marks and Maurice Gran’s nine-year dream Dreamboats and Petticoats returns to Theatre Royal, Brighton with a cast and creatives deserving high praise for creating the lightest touch out of slight narrative. Those who’ve seen it should start marvelling at the musicianship, and those who haven’t will increasingly join in.


Review: Mengele

A terrifying confrontation, set on a beach in Brazil in 1979, but really in all of our memories of a time that seems to be closer than we think.


Review: My Leonard Cohen

"A well deserved standing ovation for a unique take on Cohen"


Review: North Haven

A stark look at the values of empathy deficit dramatically told with the fleeing child from one form of oppression into the world of another before she escapes to where? We can but imagine.


Review: All or Nothing

Carol Harrison’s written the band proud and plangent; her split hero strategies work to make this one of the best possible storylines of a British band, given hell-bent Marriott burning his talent at both ends, just like the decade.


Review: Million Dollar Quartet

This is outstanding for is peerless characterising of the four legends with their unexpected female singer, the acting of Duncan and above al for the way the structure allows such extraordinary musicianship its head.


Review: Limelight

Showstopping numbers stud this heartwarming, touching new play with numbers by Liz Tait.


Review: Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour

Lee Hall’s and Vicky Featherstone‘s sell-out Edinburgh Fringe musical comes to the Theatre Royal. It more than bears out the accolades heaped on it.


Review: Faulty Towers: The Dining Experience

The most fun meal you'll have at the Fringe - without reservation. (make sure you make areservation ..)