Review: Vanya

This is the greatest one-man performance I’ve seen, said a Chekhov-immersed director of 45 years’ experience next to me. Yes.


Review: Boy In Da Korma

A necessary, engaging, original variation on finding your voice: and a theatrical coup. Acting, writing, directing, video, lighting and tech support, indeed singing are first class. A gem.


Review: Rika’s Rooms

Emma Wilkinson Wright manages the narrative as an odyssey punctuated by screams. It’s already a phenomenal performance and the actor is so wholly immersed in Rika you know you’re in the presence of something remarkable


Review: Protest Song

Tim Price’s magnificent one-man play reminds us – yells at us - how much we’re all connected, and unless we stand together, how much we lose.


Review: Bullring Techno Makeout Jamz

Bullring Techno Makeout Jamz is neither complex or fiendishly plotted. But it’s very witty, linguistically inventive and light-hearted: so its downside is highlighted.


Review: The Good Dad (A Love Story), The Mitfords

Now a superb double-bill, and makes a compelling case for these two shows to be yoked together, with their intertwining of family, sisterhood, abuse and terrible consequences.


Review: Nearly Lear

Mischievous charm, tragic depth, and hilarious wit, all fueled by an intense and energetic inventiveness. A Must See show


Review: When We Died

An absorbing one-woman play seamlessly blending physical theatre with a poignant, gut-wrenching narrative


Review: Fleabag

Original, raw, brilliantly funny and devastating. This production is Fleabag neat. Its harrowing streak of genius burns like a healing scar torn.


Review: The Return of Benjamin Lay

Naomi Wallace and actor Mark Provinelli inhabit this gestural giant with wit, sympathy, rage and an agency burning up centuries between. It’s profoundly moving too, speaks to our condition of techno-serfdom, new slavery, discrimination everywhere. The packed audience are never sure who might be picked on next, but delight in the calling-out. Superb.


Review: all of it

Still the most sheerly thrilling yet intimate piece MacDowall has written, though all three pieces amplify that. A miniature classic of snatched meaning its staging too flashes by with shocking brevity. In all it lasts just 90 minutes. Catch it.


Review: Lovefool

Though it might be red-topped as a Fleabag for the abused, it’s so much more excoriating. It’s also a work profoundly moving, necessary and – particularly for Gintare Parulyte - an act of courage. Lovefool’s on till May 26th; do rush to this 55-minute must-see.


Review: My Brilliant Divorce

Like any first-rate actor, Louise Faulkner lets each eyebrow rise and fall: Quizzical, hurt, amused, they all register. A work to be savoured for its exuberant telling of one of the most painful things to hit any of us, through nightmare to laughter to loving oneself, to the hope of love. Highly recommended.


Review: Havisham

As ever with Heather Alexander, this is a masterclass in acting. It’s also a masterclass in directing and technical address. The outstanding one-person show of the Fringe so far


Review: Pussycat in Memory of Darkness

Neda Nezhdana’s play is a world: not simply a map of pain and war footage. Both essential and in the mesmerising Kristin Millward’s and Polly Creed’s hands, with this team, it’s almost a compulsory visit.


Review: Graceland

Understanding traumatic narrative from the outside: seeing through a skylight, darkly. An impressive debut


Review: Irrelevant

Keith Merrill and Debbie Chazen have crafted an Everywoman (and man) for whoever’s gifted yet still never makes it. Look forward to a lot more of this kind from Merrill’s Le Gallienne.


Review: Sarah

An unnerving testing of that space between naturalism and hallucination, redemption and blank unknowing, studded with a language that flies off the page.


Review: Morning Glory

A small masterpiece of amused, unflinching reveal, which does something no-one else has done at all.


Review: The MP, Aunty Mandy and Me

A young gay man from a small northern village gets sucked into the heady world of working for his local MP, and faces many big dilemmas.


Review: Brother’s Keeper

A moving, harrowing and well-crafted tale of survival from childhood abuse.


Review: Push

'The writing is performed at a breathless pace but delivered with ease and control."


Review: A Eulogy for Roman

An astonishing solo show of one man’s search for meaning within himself, with audience participation.


Review: Self Service

Original idea, well developed and crafted. Mild-mannered delivery is refreshing!


Review: Prima Facie

if Comer doesn’t receive awards for this there’s no justice at all.


Review: Duck

An impressively finished play. Do see it.


Review: Damien

Outstanding on all counts. Do see it before it closes.


Review: The Last

Chittenden’s done a great service not only to Mary Shelley’s novel, but to the way we imagine. And Amy Kidd’s exemplary.


Review: Horsepower

Exceptional, both as dramatic writing, design and performance.


Review: Room

As a condensation and enactment of Woolf’s seminal text this can’t be improved on. The outstanding one-person show I’ve seen this Fringe.


Review: Mozzzi

Then it was DDT. Now it’s personal.


Review: Candy

A close encounter with a drag queen yields unexpected results


Review: Saviour

A remarkable one-person play, performed to literal fever pitch by its creator.


Review: On Arriving

On Arriving takes sixty minutes it seems we’ve been immersed in a Greek Tragedy of ninety. See it.


Review: and breathe…

Yomi Sode’s hybrid theatre is a compelling immersion of witness and poetry: we need more of it.


Review: Leaves

This haunting 45-minute tale is a superb small gem from Jermyn Street’s Footprints Festival.


Review: Jekyll & Hyde

The most viscerally convulsive realisation of Jekyll or Hyde imaginable


Review: Eng-er-Land

Writer/performer Hannah Kumari leaves you alert and exhilarated


Review: Hole

Don’t miss the chance to see this transcendent actor prove she possesses another dimension altogether.


Review: Sacrament

A revelation, superbly written and acted. Comparisons have been made with A Girl Is A Half-formed Thing. I can think of no higher praise either. You must see this.


Review: Living Newspaper #7

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch a group of young dramatists take on the future


Review: Illusions of Liberty

A finely-calibrated solo play of what it’s like to enter that tunnel of near-undiagnosable but very real illness. Corinne Walker’s both authoritative and quicksilver. Do catch it.


Review: Living Newspaper #6

Like all the Royal Court’s Living Newspaper series, we need this. Watch what this does with the future


Review: Scaramouche Jones

Shane Ritchie’s phenomenal energy and slidings in and out of tongues, mesmerises.


Review: New Moon Monologues March

Don’t be lulled by the friendly colours and fluffy fonts. Queen of Cups is absolutely a company to watch, and its showcase productions are literally unmissable


Review: Death of England: Delroy

Renders huge black experience into a narrative that bears it, because so well-constructed, so character-driven and so inhabited by Michael Balogun whose blaze of awakening is both benediction and clarion.


Review: A Kiss From Back Home

A solo performance that brings effectively to the stage the soulful disappointment of a lost relationship.


Review: The New Tomorrow

There’s a generosity here, a big hug. Theatre itself affirms the value of life to those who might yet shape it for the better.


Review: Daddy Drag

Proof that whilst you cannot fit a person into a show, you can truly theatrically lift a lid on his behaviour, the effect he leaves behind and the void that others cannot fill


Review: Death of England

This work never loses its charge, its own rapturous arrival Spall gives the performance of his career so far.


Review: Fleabag

Original, raw, brilliantly funny and devastating. This production is Fleabag neat. Its harrowing streak of genius burns like a healing scar torn.


Review: My Will & My Life

Poignant play, moving, relatable and fascinating insight into a meaningful friendship.