Review: A Splinter of Ice

Absorbing. With such an acting masterclass the play’s a bewitchingly-voiced fugue on the limits of belief and betrayal.


Review: The Chalk Garden

Not quite the last drawing-room comedy. But the Janus-faced prophesy of plays that took thirty years to catch up.


Review: Relatively Speaking

With his new production director Robin Herford, most associated with this play, brings pace, panache, and more than a dose of Ayckbourn’s generosity of spirit


Review: Leopoldstat

Stoppard’s written out his theatrical testament. Outstanding.


Review: The Dresser

If you’ve not seen The Dresser, you shouldn’t pass up this production.


Review: The Midnight Bell

An outstanding ballet by any standards. One that like its inspiration Patrick Hamilton will last.


Review: This Beautiful Future

Heartstopping. There’s an absoluteness here we need. We must prove desperate for it or die ourselves.


Review: Richard II

One of OFS’s strongest productions, it’s also a return to roots.


Review: Six

Outstanding, the finest West End musical for years


Review: The Odyssey

As spellbinding as Circe and Calypso in one


Review: Sweet William

Naturally enriched by living with Shakespeare Michael Pennington unearths local habitations and names for him.


Review: Troy Story

Again the most educative stand-up and a thrilling presentation. Oh and bloody funny on war, male sexuality and the Bechdel Test.


Review: Staircase

A first-rate revival of a play that with its ostensible shock-value in aspic, reveals subversions and a clever structure so unsettling we should all look in the mirror and wince.


Review: The Vertical Hour

The definitive Fringe revival of a mainstream play this year. Absorbing, baggy, intimate. See it.


Review: The Lady in the Van

Sarah Mann and her company will surely return with this gem of transubstantiation.


Review: Ghosts

The ultimate guilty pleasure, and not necessarily in a good way, as the slavery past of Glasgow is blown open in a gentile narrative manner


Review: Troilus and Cressida

We’re privileged to see this rarely-performed work moulded by OFS. A play for our times.


Review: Love Love Love

Epic eavesdropping casts that ultimate spell: reading ourselves by flashes of lightning.


Review: Amadeus

In the most spectacular production imaginable, Lucian Msamati’s supremely crafted lead sets off the quicksilver of his rival Adam Gillen.


Review: Les Blancs

A superb realization of Lorraine Hansberry's unfinished masterpiece - a classic of Ibsenite proportions


Review: Small Island

A reboot for the future, a passport for change.


Review: The Madness of George III

This magnificent revival poses even more urgent questions. A twitch on the thread for all of us.


Review: Coriolanus

A Coriolanus memorable for politics sinewed with personal forces: an active interrogation of democracy. And in Josie Rourke’s production Tom Hiddleston’s someone riven by intimations of his true self


Review: The Sound of Music

Phenomenal singing all round. A more than solid recommendation for that alone.


Review: The Skin Game

Treat this as a wonderful premiere you’ve not had to stir for.


Review: Wonderland

Outstanding. Surely the definitive study of the dignity of physical labour, and breaking of its amity.


Review: Afterplay

Miraculously-attuned. A wafer-thin but absolutely genuine slice of Chekhov. Do see it.


Review: Nora

Stef Smith’s brilliant riff on Ibsen’s original is revelatory


Review: The Tin Drum

Nico Holonics’ blaze-through avatar is unlikely to be surpassed.


Review: Talk

Mark Wilson and his team triumph in a whisper, and a restraining cry.


Review: The Welkin

Already a contender for one of the best plays of 2020.


Review: Henry VI

The most effective condensation of the pith of the trilogy we’re likely to see.


Review: Swive

A Hilliard rather than Holbein, it’s the velocity of Elizabeth’s survival that enthrals


Review: A Christmas Carol

The most original, potent and uplifting Christmas Carol I’ve ever seen


Review: Hunger

An exemplary, scrupulous production so starkly contemporary, it makes Hunger contemporary forever


Review: Candida

Convinces here far more than any production I’ve seen.


Review: Richard III

This production could draw out the poison of being dead serious in terminal bursts of laughter


Review: Hansard

A masterfully conceived vehicle to stalk politics now


Review: Frankenstein

There’s a clean sharp fusion between these two writers that heralds something special.


Review: Amsterdam

Did I say sucker-punch? It’s what the Orange Tree do every time.


Review: Kemp’s Jig

A wonderfully told tale of a forgotten man in the history of Elizabethan theatre


Review: Hitler’s Tasters

You will stumble out at the end completely bowled over by the power of this play


Review: Taboo

A chilling glimpse into the world of a little known but influential woman from the Nazi era.


Review: Henry V

The enormous energy Sarah Amankwah brings proclaims greatness in the making


Review: All I See Is You

Funny, upsetting and with just the right amount of teenage angst - it’s 1960’s UK. This is a coming of age story where queer men are never truly permitted to come of age.