Review: Is God Is

A stunning, preternaturally timed production


Review: Between Two Waves

A play about the Climate Crisis, family, photography and being screwed by insurance.


Review: Two Horsemen

The glaring energy of this piece can’t disguise how it strikes profundity in its funny-bone.


Review: The Merchant of Venice

A fleet traversal memorable for insights the company bring during and after their performance of it


Review: This House

Vibrant proof as to why it’s been called the play of the decade


Review: The Two Noble Kinsmen

We’re looking at a bright Book of Hours. Barrie Rutter’s done it profound service, adding a warmth and agency that opens up this pageant. This is hopefully just the first of many such he’ll bring to the Globe.


Review: The Winter’s Tale

Far more than a curate’s egg, this production reveals things we’ve never seen


Review: The Visit

Kushner’s just brought The Visit home with him.


Review: The Taming of the Shrew

See it and you’ll never think of the Shrew without this groundbreaking stab at the dreams of men.


Review: You Stupid Darkness!

Bleakly funny, with flickers of tragedy, to make you see how redemptive kindness is


Review: Cops

A first-rate distillation of cop drama, into the theatre of cop’s lives.


Review: Apologia

Richly charactered, thoroughly absorbing.


Review: Scenes with girls

Scenes with girls owns a buzz, a life, a difference about loving that gives it a sliver of unique.


Review: The Winterling

A triumph. Nearly flawless, it must be seen by anyone interested in contemporary drama.


Review: A Christmas Carol

The most original, potent and uplifting Christmas Carol I’ve ever seen


Review: Shadows

Speaks with a fierce innocence


Review: Toast

A quietly magical production that knows its own truth and serves it hot.


Review: Vassa

A really worthwhile production with a few missed opportunities


Review: The Dutch Lady

A consummate production of a memorably dark comedy


Review: Fleabag

Original, raw, brilliantly funny and devastating. This production is Fleabag neat. Its harrowing streak of genius burns like a healing scar torn.


Review: Bartholomew Fair

If only one could see it twice: but try it at least once.


Review: Bleeding Black

Rugby is not a sport. It’s a religion, a way of life. Just ask any Kiwi.


Review: Beep Boop

A one man mime and physical comedy theatre show with a live digital soundscape, exploring society’s uneasy obsession with online life and the curious delusional pull away from an actually lonely reality.


Review: Umbrella Man

Start your Fringe day with a bang in the hands of a very talented poet and storyteller


Review: The House of Influenza

A solo show of many zany characters exploring what one might do in a suburban zombie attack if an over indulgence in horror movies is your only frame of reference


Review: Hitler’s Tasters

You will stumble out at the end completely bowled over by the power of this play


Review: 2 for 1

Two one-woman shows: “that’s twice you’ll get to ask, ‘is she ok??’”


Review: White Pearl

The finest new play from the Court this year, gleaming and deadly


Review: Hysteria

In all the flurry of Fringe, don’t miss this gem.


Review: Freak

A play everyone should see – and a first-rate revival.


Review: The Glass Piano

A bewitching mix of deconstructive magic and fabulous therapy, it’s above all Grace Molony who brushes distinction into this already distinctive production.


Review: Mary’s Babies

Maud Dromgoole’s proved more than adroit, skilful, and deliciously risk-taking. A must-see.


Review: Rotterdam

Rotterdam’s an outstanding play about sexual identity, choices, and above all what it means to transition.


Review: The Price

An outstanding production, rescuing a classic from attic shadows.


Review: Loving Androids

A beautifully-constructed play, small in compass, big in scope and deft at managing the transitions


Review: Bodies

Still masterly, and in this rare revival, a must-see.


Review: Shipwreck

A superb ensemble piece. Of all dramas on these interesting times in America, it’s the one truly necessary.


Review: Cyprus Avenue

Devastating drama about the DNA of bigotry; and it all starts in surreal farce.


Review: The Double Dealer

I doubt if there’s ever been a production as good as this.


Review: The Tell-Tale Heart

As an electric shock to schlock gothic, theatre doesn’t come much better than this.


Review: Allelujah!

Bennett’s exhorting us to fight back with laughter and rage in this riveting, timely play. It’s a sad and angry consolation.


Review: Stories

Utterly compelling. Anything Nina Raine writes now is routinely expected to touch greatness. No pressure.


Review: Cock

A superb revival of Bartlett’s warmest, most ground-breaking, perhaps most enduring play so far.


Review: Measure for Measure

The most thoughtful and thought-provoking recreation of a Shakespeare play this year.


Review: Happy Now?

However fine the original 2008 cast, you won’t miss them with this company’s revival of a stunning contemporary play. See it.


Review: The Graduate

There’s so many reasons to see this production. It’s worth hanging around for returns.


Review: Home, I’m Darling

It’s a moment when rejoicing to concur with the general public, as Samuel Johnson once did over Gray’s Elegy, is the only thing to do.


Review: The One

This breaks rules as it makes them. See it.


Review: Fear Itself

funny, dark and frightening - a psychological thriller that will keep you on your toes


Review: Katie Johnstone

Most of all you take away the sheer bravura of Georgia May Hughes’ throwing everything up in the air. She carries the energy to a cheery bleakness. And you want to cheer.


Review: The Merchant of Venice

Exceptional in many things, it’s almost a classic production and definitely worth a detour for.


Review: Flesh and Bone

Warren’s East London heritage is similar to other writers, and it’s his time to re-tell it now, with new notes and a love of language that muscles in and won’t let go.


Review: The Winter’s Tale

If Sicilia and its dense expressive syntax could rise elsewhere, this might be altogether remarkable. As it is, enjoy its slow burn.


Review: The Two Noble Kinsmen

We’re looking at a bright Book of Hours. Barrie Rutter’s done it profound service, adding a warmth and agency that opens up this pageant. This is hopefully just the first of many such he’ll bring to the Globe.


Review: Fleabag

Original, raw, brilliantly funny and devastating. This production is Fleabag neat. Its harrowing streak of genius burns like a healing scar torn.


Review: Confidence

This is a must-see in reviving the theatrical profile of a fine dramatist for too long shrouded in the digital of radio and TV when the acoustic world is claiming her back.


Review: Blank Tiles

A heartrending tragic-comedy one-man show about memory, Scrabble and Alzheimer’s. 


Review: Into the Woods

This is an outstanding first-class revival, but more, it’s intimate knowing and innocent at the same time: it sports a residual wisdom beyond its brief.