Review: Metamorphoses

The overriding sense, not surprisingly with these actors, is joy.


Review: The Normal Heart

An outstanding revival. If you see one play this autumn, make it this one.


Review: Is God Is

A stunning, preternaturally timed production


Review: Leopoldstat

Stoppard’s written out his theatrical testament. Outstanding.


Review: Julius Caesar

A fleet powerful Julius Caesar, with some outstanding performances


Review: Romeo and Juliet

A fleet, brilliantly upending, wholly relevant take on the Verona-ready toxicity feeding male violence and young depression


Review: This Beautiful Future

Heartstopping. There’s an absoluteness here we need. We must prove desperate for it or die ourselves.


Review: Paradise

A sleeping classic in the making


Review: Richard II

One of OFS’s strongest productions, it’s also a return to roots.


Review: Miss Julie

The end is like life-blood draining away. It’s what Strindberg meant. See it.


Review: Troilus and Cressida

We’re privileged to see this rarely-performed work moulded by OFS. A play for our times.


Review: Macbeth

A stylishly visceral production.


Review: The Spanish Tragedy

The OFS are taking flight with the best scratch nights the Elizabethans never had.


Review: King John

A tedious brief tragedy? King John is fun… It’s been said.


Review: Coriolanus

A Coriolanus memorable for politics sinewed with personal forces: an active interrogation of democracy. And in Josie Rourke’s production Tom Hiddleston’s someone riven by intimations of his true self


Review: The Two Noble Kinsmen

We’re looking at a bright Book of Hours. Barrie Rutter’s done it profound service, adding a warmth and agency that opens up this pageant. This is hopefully just the first of many such he’ll bring to the Globe.


Review: Antony and Cleopatra

Supremely worth it to see a pair so famous weighing equal in their own balance, perhaps for the first time.


Review: Frankenstein (alternate version)

The acting scales cliff-edges of unreason. One remembers the scale of betrayal and loss of redemption. Benedict Cumberbatch here is Frankenstein, Jonny Lee Miller the Creature. The alternate version aired first is still available.


Review: Frankenstein

The acting scales cliff-edges of unreason. One remembers the scale of betrayal and loss of redemption


Review: Romeo and Juliet

Completeness is just one reason to cherish this clean-driven clear-headed production


Review: Hamlet

In Michelle Terry’s quicksilver, quick-quipping Hamlet, much has been proved, from interpretive to gender fluidity in tragic action, that sets a privilege on being in at a beginning.


Review: Women Beware Women

A stylish, timely production which redefines how we experience Middleton.


Review: The Visit

Kushner’s just brought The Visit home with him.


Review: Blood Brothers

The blend of definitive and new cast members in a recent classic has overwhelming impact: as story, as lyric fable, as terrible moral for these distracted times.


Review: The Duchess of Malfi

The scalpel and scruple of class and coolness breaks into tragedy and gifts us three outstanding moments


Review: Richard III

This production could draw out the poison of being dead serious in terminal bursts of laughter


Review: Blood Wedding

In several ways, this is about as good as it gets.


Review: Frankenstein

There’s a clean sharp fusion between these two writers that heralds something special.


Review: I Run

A vivid solo performance of a man running furious, powerful and heartbroken into the grief of his dead daughter.


Review: The Mill on the Floss

Stunning. This consummate, flawless production is an event for BLT and Brighton


Review: Rosmersholm

They compel attention, they demand we follow every sigh